Moving time  4 hours 11 minutes

Time  7 hours 49 minutes

Coordinates 2889

Uploaded March 19, 2019

Recorded March 2019

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188 f
0 f
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2.7
5.5
10.94 mi

Viewed 117 times, downloaded 10 times

near City of Westminster, England (United Kingdom)

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Yesterday I made a short tour of the two banks of the Thames, moving between the area of Westminster and the square of Trafalgar. First day and first time in London and I enjoyed the ride. Today I wanted to extend the route, reaching the Tower Bridge in London, and if yesterday I liked what I saw I have to say that today I have not stopped taking pictures. It has been an extraordinary day, 8 hours walking calmly, admiring the hundreds of houses, bridges, palaces churches, markets, that I was finding. In the end I did not know what to photograph, because I wanted to retain in my memory everything that I found. A magnificent day without a doubt.
The walk has been long, almost 18 km. but anyone can do it, provided they have a whole day to do it. I say this because my wife has accompanied me who is not excited to walk and has done perfectly, has tired as usual but enjoying it as much as I do.
I want to warn that I did not get to the BigBen and the Westminster Palace in this walk. It may seem unfair that this route only shows a distant image of these buildings that are World Heritage but the truth is that, given the location of my Hotel, I had already walked around on several occasions. Due to this I crossed the Thames by the Golden Jubilee Bridge although, as you can see on the map of the route, you do not walk any further if you choose not to cross over there and continue walking along the river until you reach the height of the river. both monuments. There you can choose to surround the entire Palace of Westminster and you will have the opportunity to see and admire, also, Westminster Abbey. In the end perhaps the route will have lengthened somewhat more than 1 km. But, if it is not exhausted, it will have been worth it. In the different waypoints I have attached quite detailed information (all copied from other sources, the truth) of each of the points of interest of the route, which are many
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Building of interest

Entrada del County Hall

County Hall is an old building in central London, whose interior has been transformed into an interesting center for leisure, entertainment and culture. The County Hall is located in the Lambeth district, on the banks of the River Thames, just at the northern end of the Westminster Bridge and very close to other attractions in the city such as the London Eye, Big Ben and Parliament. The County Hall was for many years the Government House of London, the seat of the County Council of London and later the Greater London Council and the London Education Authority. The imposing building was the work of the architect Ralph Knott, who endowed it with a careful Baroque Edwardian style raised with Portland stone. The construction began in 1911 but was interrupted due to the two world wars. It was completed in the year 1958. County Hall today Currently the County Hill is owned by a Japanese company that has transformed it into an interesting and tourist leisure center full of cultural activities and entertainment. It houses several places of interest such as the London Aquarium, the Dalí Universe Museum, the London Film Museum and the Namco Station. It also has a 5-star hotel called Marriott Hotel and a large group of restaurants and shops.
panorama

Vistas desde este lugar

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Bridge

Blackfriars bridge

What follows has been copied from puentemania.com The current bridge of Blackfriars was designed by Thomas Cubitt and H. Carr, and was opened to traffic in 1869. The structure consists of five iron arches on piles of concrete and granite with a total length of 281 m. The width of the board is 32.4 m, after a refurbishment in 1910, and the central arch rises 7.1 m above the level of the Thames. In the past there was another bridge of Blackfriars, built in 1769 on a project by Robert Mylne, which was composed of nine semi-elliptical arches, in the style of the Florentine bridges.
panorama

Panorámica del Támesis con la cúpula de la Saint Paul’s Cathedral y los rascacielos de la City

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Museum

La Tate Modern

Everything that follows has been copied from Wikipedia.org Tate Modern is the name by which the British National Museum of Modern Art is known. It is located in the center of London and is part of the Tate group of museums along with Tate Britain, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives, these last two located outside of London. It is housed in the former Bankside power station, originally designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott and built in two phases between 1947 and 1963. The power plant was closed in 1981 and the building was converted into a museum by the Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron, who after being winners in an international competition gave the building its current image. Since its opening on May 12, 2000 it has become the second largest attraction in London, in 2007 it was the most visited museum of modern art in the world and the third in general, after the Louvre Museum in Paris and the British Museum. also of London, with 5.2 million visitors. Admission is free for permanent exhibition, while temporary exhibitions are free or paid according to their character. The construction of Tate Modern has been a boost to the economic and cultural development of the Southwark area in which it is located. It has been considered an example for future projects, as a way to develop degraded areas of the city and turn them into new dynamic foci of growth and economic development.
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Building of interest

The Globe

What follows has been copied from wikipedia.org For the construction of this theater material from the dismantled The Theater was used. When in 1597 the license of that theater expired (the first of the Elizabethan period) its owner, James Burbage, had to move it from the other side of the River Thames changing its name. Like most of the theaters of the time (with the exception of the Blackfriars that were covered), The Globe was a construction without a roof for the proscenium part, which prevented the presentations on rainy days, for this reason, and because of the cold of the winter, the theater only worked during the summer (from May to October) while the light of day lasted. The presentations were carried out during the weekends, they began after lunch, at approximately two in the afternoon (they had lunch around eleven, twelve) and they extended until before nightfall; This was done for obvious reasons of lack of illumination. The locations cost from a penny in the proscenium (where they were standing) to six for the audience. This theater served as a welcome to the theater company Lord Chamberlain's Men in which the famous playwright William Shakespeare participated; this site had the honor of being the cradle of works such as King Lear, Julius Caesar, Macbeth, Hamlet, Othello, etc. In 1613 a fire destroyed the theater facilities, however it was immediately rebuilt in 1614 and demolished in 1644 under the shadows of the reborn English Puritanism that condemned the theatrical performances of the Elizabethan era. In 1997 the theater reopened its doors under the name of Shakespeare's Globe Theater respecting the forms of the old construction. The site is located about 200 meters from the site where it opened its doors for the first time. Like the original, only theatrical works are exhibited during the summer season, but unlike that, it only has capacity for 1500 people.
panorama

Vistas de The Globe y del Southwark Bridge

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Bridge

The Southwark Bridge

The following has been copied from: puentemania.com The Southwark bridge crosses the River Thames in London, downstream from the Millenium footbridge. The origin of this bridge is to be found in 1811, when John Rennie, an English engineer (also responsible for the New London Bridge) projects a bridge of three cast iron arches about 300 m from the old London port of Queenhithe. It was inaugurated in 1819, and presented the largest cast iron arch of the moment (73 m), to ensure navigation. In principle it was necessary to pay a toll to cross it, so it was hardly used, until in 1864 the payment was eliminated. The increase in traffic, then, showed the dimensional deficiencies of the bridge, with a too narrow board, and thus, in 1913 the structure was demolished. The new bridge, by Ernest George and Basil Mott, has five steel arches supported by stacks of concrete lined with ashlar masonry. Although the bridge is symmetrical, its arches are not the same: the central span is the largest of all (42.5 m), and the two ends are smaller (37.5 m) than the intermediate ones (40 m). Built by Sir William Arrol & Co., it was opened in 1921 by King George V.
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Building of interest

The Anchor, pub

What follows I have copied from losrinconesdelondres.wordpress.com. One of the oldest pubs that you can find in London, is from 1615 although it must be said it was rebuilt in 1676, after having suffered damage in the "Great Fire" of 1666. This tavern that attracts so much attention for its façade in red tones, was formerly frequented by stevedores, smugglers and pirates. Today it is popular with workers in the surrounding offices. It is located near "The Clink" the most famous prison in London opened for more than 600 years that can now be visited as a museum, it is also close to where "The Globe" was the theater where Shakespeare represented his works (which is not the that there is now, that is a replica, the real one was 200 meters away). Samuel Pepys, who was a naval administrator and member of Parliament, although now he is remembered by the newspaper that accompanied him for 10 years, in which he told everything he saw, and precisely in 1666 when the "Great Fire" began he He was in The Anchor, and he stayed there, reflecting in his diary how the fire was growing. Samuel Johnson also frequented this tavern, and among several works and essays here was where he wrote the first English Dictionary
Ruins

Winchester Palace

Ver descripción del lugar en la cuarta fotografia adjunta
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Mooring point

Golden Hind

What follows has been copied from wikipedia.org The Golden Hind (Golden Doe) was an English galleon best known for its circumnavigation of the globe between 1577 and 1580, captained by the corsair Francis Drake. Its original name was Pelican, being renamed halfway through the trip in 1577, when it was preparing to enter the Strait of Magellan. He renamed his ship as a political gesture, congrating himself with his patron, Christopher Hatton, whose coat of arms had a golden doe. This model is a reproduction of the royal
panorama

Edificio en este lugar

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Sacred architecture

Southwark Cathedral

What follows has been copied from wikipedia.org It is the mother church of the Anglican Diocese of Southwark. It has been a place of Christian worship for about 1000 years, but it is a cathedral only since 1905. The present building is fundamentally Gothic, dating from between 1220 and 1420. The railway line that connects the London Bridge station with the Cannon Street station passes very close to the cathedral, blocking the view from the south side. The medieval Borough Market and the hall of the excellent company of Glassworkers and Glass Painters [3] are located nearby.
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Building of interest

Borough Market

Magnificent, small but with quality food products, within a very interesting architectural structure. It's worth the visit
Sacred architecture

Zona trasera de la Southwark Cathedral

panorama

Vista de los rascacielos de la City de Londres

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Mooring point

HMS Belfast .

This boat can be visited to see how these marine wineries of the Second World War were The following has been copied from: trucoslondres.com This ship was ordered to build in 1936 and from 1939 he participated, among others, in the Normandy landings. In total it was operative during 32 years to the orders of Great Britain. Once the Second World War ended, it was used for humanitarian purposes. In 1971 it began to be used as a floating museum.
panorama

Vista de la Hay’s Gallery y del HMS Belfast en este punto de nuestro paseo

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Bridge

Tower Bridge

Everything that follows has been copied from: Wikipedia.org The Bridge of the Tower, in English Tower Bridge, is a bridge that crosses the River Thames in London. It combines the characteristics of swinging bridge and suspension bridge. It is built in neo-Gothic Victorian style, and is located near the Tower of London, which gives it its name During the second part of the 19th century, economic development in East London led to the need for a new passage over the river, below the London Bridge. The traditional fixed bridge could not be built because it would cut off access to the port that at that time was located in the Pool of London (the original Port of London), between the London Bridge and the Tower of London. In 1875 a special committee was created to find a solution to the passage over the river, which called for a contest to choose the design of the future bridge. More than fifty designs were proposed, including one by Sir Joseph Bazalgette. The evaluation of the designs was surrounded by controversy, and it was not until 1884 when the one created by Horace Jones, the Architect of the City, was approved. The design of Jones was a bascule bridge of 244 m in length and 7 m in width with two towers of 65 m of height. The central distance of 61 m between the two towers is divided into two cams, which can be raised to an angle of 83 degrees to allow river traffic to pass. Although each cam weighs more than 1000 tons, they are counterbalanced to minimize the energy required to lift them, which takes a minute. The original hydraulic mechanism, designed by William Armstrong, used pressurized water stored in six accumulators. The water was pumped into the accumulators by steam engines.
Bridge

Tower Bridge

Bridge

Cruzando el Tower Bridge

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World Heritage Site

Vistas de la Tower of London y del Tower Bridge

What follows has been copied from wikipedia, com The Tower of London, officially the Royal Palace and Fortress of His Majesty, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London, England. It is located within the London district of Tower Hamlets, separated from the northern boundary of the city by an open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives its name to the entire castle, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078, becoming a symbol of oppression in London by the new ruling elite. From at least 1100, the castle was used as a prison, although this was not the primary purpose. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings located within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat; the castle was extended in several phases, especially under the command of Ricardo Corazón de León, Enrique III and Eduardo I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general disposition of the late thirteenth century has remained in spite of subsequent activity. The Tower of London has played an important role in the history of England. It was besieged several times and having it under control was important to control the country. The tower has served as armory, treasury, menagerie, Royal Mint, public records, and house of the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom. From the early fourteenth century until the reign of Charles II, a procession was organized from the tower to the Abbey of Westminster at the coronation of a new monarch. It should be noted that in the absence of the monarch, the guard of the tower is in charge of the castle (the guard was a position of confidence in the medieval period). At the end of the 15th century, the castle became a prison. Under the reign of the Tudors, the tower was used less as a residence, and despite attempts to refortify and repair the castle, the development of its defenses was left behind for artillery. The height of the use of the castle as a prison came in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when people like Elizabeth I (before becoming queen) fell into disgrace and were retained between these walls. This use has resulted in the saying "send to the Tower" as synonymous with "send to prison." Despite its reputation as a place of torture and death, popularized by sixteenth-century religious and writers of the nineteenth century, only seven people were executed inside the tower before the World Wars. Executions were usually carried out on the Tower Hill, north of the castle, which in a period of 400 years witnessed 112 executions. In the second half of the 20th century, institutions such as the Casa de la Moneda moved to other locations from the Tower of London, leaving many buildings empty. The architects Anthony Salvin and John Taylor then took the opportunity to restore the tower to its original medieval appearance, removing many of the post-medieval structures that remained empty. During the World Wars, the tower was used again as a prison, witnessing the execution of twelve people for espionage. After the wars, the damage was repaired and the castle reopened its doors to the public. Today, the Tower of London is one of the most famous tourist attractions in the country. Maintenance is provided by the Historic Royal Palaces (Historic Royal Palaces) charity, and was declared a World Heritage Site by Unesco in 1988, as it is an exceptionally well preserved Norman medieval fortress and for its significance as a center of power uninterrupted for centuries and centuries of British and European history.
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Sacred architecture

All Hallows by the Tower

The following has been copied from: londonpass.es All Hallows by the Tower is the oldest church in the city of London. It predates the Tower of London for almost three hundred years, and was founded in the year 675 AD. An arch of the original church Saxon remains. Under the arch is a Roman pavement, discovered in 1926, evidence of the city's life on this site from the best part of two thousand years. William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania, was baptized in the church and educated in the classroom (now the Parish Hall). John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the USA, married in All Saints in 1797.
Building of interest

Uno de los grandes edificios de la City de Londres

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Building of interest

The Monument

The following has been copied from: London.es The Monument is a large Doric stone column 61 meters high crowned by a urn in the shape of fire, which represents the Great Fire of London in 1666. The 61 meters of height of the column match the distance to which it is located. from the place where the fire started, the Thomas Farynor Bakery.
panorama

Vista de la cúpula de la St. Paul’s Cathedral

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Sacred architecture

St Paul’s Cathedral

What follows has been copied from: londresando.com The Cathedral of San Pablo is an imposing building that belongs to the Anglican church, of English baroque style and soothes of the bishopric of London. St Paul's Cathedral, as it is called in English, is the third largest temple of Christianity in Europe, after St. Peter's Vatican and the Cathedral of Seville. The site it occupies has been dedicated to San Pablo since 604, the year in which the first church in England was built and which was built with wood. Its dome, inspired by the Renaissance artist Michelangelo designed for the Vatican, is 30 meters in diameter and is decorated with paintings representing the life of the apostle San Pablo; under it is the main altar and is crowned by the Golden Gallery, which is accessed by 350 steps and from where you can see a beautiful view of the city of London. Thanks to it, it was the tallest building in the English capital until 1962. The Central Nave consists of three chapels and the dome has three circular galleries, in addition to the Golden Gallery, mentioned above, the most famous being the Wishpering Gallery or Gallery of Whispers, whose peculiar acoustics makes us whisper a few words against the wall, these can be heard from any other part of the gallery. In the Crypt, large, there are hundreds of graves, statues and memorials of important figures of British history as the same Wren (first person buried here), Admiral Nelson, Winston Churchill, Alexander Fleming and Florenece Nightingale. It began to be built in 1676 by the architect Christopher Wren, on the ruins of an ancient cathedral that burned in the Great Fire of London in 1666. It is one of the few buildings that survived the bombings of World War II despite being hit by a projectile in 1941. The cathedral has been and is the scene of significant events such as royal weddings (Charles and Diana), funerals (Winston Churchill, and that of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher), Jubilees of queens Victoria and Elizabeth II and religious services to commemorate the end of both World Wars.
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Building of interest

Paternoster Square

What follows has been copied from: wikipedia. Org. Paternoster Square is an urban project owned by Mitsubishi Estate, located next to the Cathedral of Saint Paul in the City of London. The area, named after Paternoster Row, the center of the London publishing industry, was destroyed by the blitz's aerial bombardments during World War II. It currently houses the London Stock Exchange, which moved here from Threadneedle Street in 2004. It also contains the headquarters of investment banks such as Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch and Nomura Securities, and fund manager Fidelity Investments.
Sacred architecture

Vista de la entrada de la St Paul’s Cathedral

Waypoint

Una bonita calle, una más

Information

Zona John Carpenter Street

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Building of interest

Accediendo al Middle Temple

Another place on this route that I had no prior knowledge and that was a very pleasant surprise. When you enter, without knowing the origin or the reason for this complex, you feel that you are in a small world separated from what surrounds you. It is worth exploring. What follows now has been copied from: wikipedia.org. The Middle Temple (officially called in English The Honorable Society of the Middle Temple), is one of the four Inns of Court, professional groups within the Common Law Anglo-Saxon to which the lawyers of England and Wales must belong to practice their profession as barristers. The Inns of Court act in Anglo-Saxon law in a manner similar to a bar association in other countries; the other Inns of Court of England will be the Inner Temple, Gray's Inn and the Lincoln's Inn. In their beginnings, dating back to the fourteenth century, the Inns of Court had as their sole function to serve as university schools dedicated only to laws, until in 1852 they withdrew that function. However, the Inns of Court continue to serve as training entities in advocacy for students, and newly graduated lawyers, in addition to supporting the professional specialization of young lawyers and organizing academic-legal cultural activities. The current headquarters of the Middle Temple is a complex of old buildings located within the City of London, within the historical and financial area, in a town bordering Westminster near the Royal Courts of Justice.
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Building of interest

Plaza en la que se encuentra el Middle Temple Hall

The following has been copied from: viamichelin.es. Inaugurated in 1575 by Isabel I, this vast Tudor-style brick building features a splendid oak frame in the form of an inverted double nave (1574) and stained glass windows decorated with heraldic motifs. The panels of the wooden cladding are decorated with the coats of arms of the teachers who instructed the students in the Middle Ages. It is said that it was here, on February 2, 1602, before the queen and the deans, that Shakespeare gave the first performance of his Twelfth Night.
Building of interest

Continuando en el inteior del Middle Temple

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Building of interest

Royal Courts of justice

All the explanation that follows about this monumental building has been copied from: wilipedia.org. The Royal Courts of Justice (in English, Royal Courts of Justice), is the building of London that lodges the Court of Appeal of England and Wales and the High Court of Justice of England and Wales. The courtrooms are open to the public although there are restrictions depending on the nature of the trials that are taking place. The building is a large gray stone structure of Victorian Gothic style and was designed by George Edmund Street, a lawyer who became an architect. It was built in the 1870s. The Royal Courts of Justice were opened by Queen Victoria in December 1882. They are located on Strand, in the City of Westminster, near the City of London and Camden. It is surrounded by the four Inns of Court and the London School of Economics. The nearest subway stations are Chancery Lane and Temple. Those who do not have legal assistance receive assistance within the court building. The Citizen Advice Office has a small branch in the main hall of the building where there are lawyers who give advice free of charge. Usually there is always a queue to receive this service. There is also a Personal Support Unit where in-person litigants can receive emotional support and practical information about what is going on in the trial. The Central Criminal Court, popularly known as Old Bailey, is located 800 meters to the east. It has no other connection with the Royal Courts of Justice. The 11 architects that struggled to get the construction contract for the courts presented different designs with a view to a possible location of the building in the Embankment. The current headquarters was chosen after much debate. Finally in 1868 it was decided that George Edmund Street would be the only architect of the Royal Courts of Justice and that it would be he who would design the entire building from the foundations to the pinnacles. The building was begun in 1873. There was a stonemasons strike that threatened to spread to other sectors and caused work to stop. As a result, foreign labor was brought in, mostly Germans. This increased the hostility of the strikers and the new workers had to eat and sleep in the building. However, these disputes were finally resolved and the building took eight years to be built and was officially opened by Queen Victoria on December 4, 1882. Street died before the building was completed. The Parliament paid 1,453,000 pounds for the 24,000 square meters on which the courts were built, after the demolition of 450 houses. Up to 700,000 pounds of the cost of the building was paid with accumulated money from estates of intestate succession. Work in oak and court accessories cost 70,000 pounds, and with decoration and furniture the final cost came to 1,000,000 pounds. The dimensions of the building (rounding) are: 140 m from east to west; 140 m from north to south; and 75 m from the Strand level to the point of the arrow. Entering through the main doors from the Strand you pass under two porticos meticulously carved with iron doors. The external portico has carved the heads of the most important judges and lawyers. On the highest point of the upper arch there is a figure of Jesus; to the left and right at a lower level are the figures of Solomon and Alfred the Great; Moses' is on the north facade of the building. Also in this façade, on the entrance of the Judges there is a stone cat and a dog that represent the parties that fight in a trial. On each side there are doors leading to the various courtrooms, as well as to the jury room and witnesses, from which separate stairs lead to their place in the courtroom. During the 1960s, the jury rooms on the ground floor were converted into courtrooms. At each end of the hall there are two beautiful marble galleries from which you can see the main Hall. The walls and ceilings are covered in oak, which in most cases is carefully carved. In room 4, the Lord Chief Justice room, there is a real coat of arms made of wood. Each room has a unique interior, and are designed by different architects. There are, besides waiting rooms, several rooms of Arbitration and Consultation together with Chambers of Togas for lawyers.
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Sacred architecture

St Mary le Strand

What follows has been copied from: guialondres.es Located in the area of the Strand, in the district of Westminster, St Mary Le Strand is currently the official church of the Women's Royal Naval Service. The first news we have of St Mary Le Strand goes back to the year 1222, although then it received the name of Santa María de los Inocentes. The building was destroyed in 1549 by Edward Seymour, Duke of Somerset, who was building Somerset House and promised the parishioners that he would build a new one, which he never did. Already in 1714, it was the first church built by the architect James Gibbs of those included in the plan of the 50 churches designed by Queen Anne, of which only twelve were made. Outside St Mary Le Strand, its tower stands out, narrowing as it rises, and whose construction was not foreseen in the initial plans. The exterior walls, like much of the interiors, are richly carved in the purest Baroque style. The main facade is made in imitation of the Cathedral of San Pablo, while the sides are built in imitation of the Palazzo Branconio dell'Aquila, designed by Raphael, and Santa Maria della Pace, which is located in Rome. The walls of the interior of the church are also laboriously worked, while the ceiling is inspired by the works made by Luigi Fontana in the Santi Apostoli church and by Pietro da Cortona in the Santi Luca e Martina church, both located in Rome. The carvings made by the sculptor John Simmonds must be highlighted in a special way. His are those located in the presbytery, on the doors of the sacristy and on the altar. Also noteworthy are the paintings made by the American painter Mather Brown in the year 1785, such as "The Greeting of the Angel Gabriel to the Blessed Virgin Mary" or "The Agony in the Garden of Gethsemane." More information at http://www.stmarylestrand.org
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Building of interest

Somerset House

What follows has been copied from: Wikipedia.org. Somerset House is one of the great historical buildings of Great Britain. It is located on the north bank of the Thames, opposite the National Theater in London, in the southern part of The Strand. Built in the 18th century by Sir William Chambers, on a palace of the Tudor period, it originally housed government offices, scientific societies and the Naval Office. In 1604, the Treaty of London was signed in the original tudor palace that ended the Anglo-Spanish War of 1585-1604. The conditions of the treaty were favorable to the Spanish Empire, in exchange for the commitment not to try to restore Catholicism in the Kingdom of England. Recently, thanks to an investment of 48 million pounds, Somerset House has become home to various museums, restaurants and cafes. Two of the best-known museums are the Courtauld Institute of Art and the Gilbert Collection of Decorative Arts. It is also the headquarters of the Royal Society of Literature.
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Building of interest

Covent Garden

What follows has been copied from london.es. Covent Garden is one of the most fascinating areas of London. In this area, street performers strive to maintain a happy atmosphere while visitors walk through the shops or enjoy a coffee. The history of the current square of Covent Garden began in the seventeenth century, when the land passed from the hands of the monks of Westminster to be owned by the Counts of Bedford. In 1631 work began on converting the cultivation area into a public square. In the year 1660 a large market of flowers, fruits and vegetables was created that made the neighborhood famous and, at the beginning of the 19th century, the appearance of the square was modified by the construction of three covered pavilions that came to house the market. In 1974 the market building was rehabilitated to be transformed into a commercial area that has remained to this day, attracting both tourists and Londoners with its bohemian and welcoming air. Currently, Covent Garden continues to be a very special neighborhood, animated at any time of the day. In the area you can enjoy the fashionable shops located on Floral Street, or the small stalls of the master craftsmen of the covered commercial area. It is also possible to spend a pleasant afternoon having a coffee in any of the many places, visiting the Transport Museum in London or going to one of the functions of the Royal Opera House. If you can visit the area on a Thursday, the Piazza is filled with candy stalls and artisan cakes, and some others who prepare delicious food at the time.
Building of interest

Junto al mercado de Covent Garden

Information

Otro de los bonitos rincones de esta ruta

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Building of interest

Trafalgar Square

The following has been copied from: londresciudad.com The central Trafalgar Square is full of life and it is not surprising, as it is one of the most important areas of London. Undoubtedly, Trafalgar Square is the most representative and famous square in London, the undisputed meeting point of Londoners, with a constant influx of tourists who consider this place an essential visit on their trip to the English capital. The most characteristic of this square built in 1845 is its large column, which pays homage to Vice Admiral Horatio Nelson, who won the Battle of Trafalgar, which gives its name to the busy square. This column reaches a height of more than 50 meters, crowned by a sculpture of the Vice Admiral. Surrounding the obelisk you can see the bronze sculpture of giant lions molded by the architect Sir Edwin Lutyens. Flanking the column are the harmonious sources of crystal clear water that suppose a breath of freshness, especially on hot days. To the north of the square stands the building that gives Trafalgar Square its majestic appearance. It is the National Gallery, which owns the most important pictorial collection in England with works that span from 1250 to 1900. Another construction worthy of admiration is the church of St Martin in the Fields in the northwest corner. Charing Cross is the name of a street that leaves from the square. This point corresponds to the zero kilometer of London, like the Puerta del Sol in Madrid.
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Building of interest

El Támesis y el London Eye

What follows has been copied from wikipedia.org. The London Eye is 135 m high and the wheel circle has a diameter of 120 m. When it opened to the public in 2000 it was the tallest Ferris wheel in the world. However, its height was surpassed by the Star of Nanchang (160 m) in 2006, by the Singapore Flyer (165 m) in 2008, and by the High Roller of Las Vegas (168 m) in 2014. Sustained by a structure with A shape on the one hand, unlike the higher standards of Nanchang and Singapore, the London Eye is described by its owners as "the tallest cantilever in the world". The London Eye was the highest public viewing point in London until it was overtaken by the viewpoint on the 72nd floor of The Shard, 245m high, which opened to the public on 1 February 2013. The London Eye is adjacent to the west side of the Jubilee Gardens (which previously housed the former Dome of Discovery), and is located on the South Bank of the River Thames between the Westminster Bridge and the Hungerford Bridge, next to the Condal Hall, the Municipality of Lambeth. The London Eye was designed by the team of Julia Barfield and her husband David Marks, from the Marks Barfield Architects studio. Mace was the company responsible for the management of the construction, while Hollandia was the main contractor for steel and Tilbury Douglas materials the civil contractor. The foundations were designed by consulting engineers Tony Gee & Partners, while Beckett Rankine planned the works carried out on the water. City planning consultant Nathaniel Lichfield and Partners helped The Tussauds Group get the necessary permits to alter the retaining wall of the South Bank of the Thames. They also examined the implications of the original contract and prepared the requests for urban planning permits necessary for the permanent conservation of the attraction, which involved the preparation of an environmental statement and a statement of support detailing the reasons for its conservation. The hoop of the London Eye is supported by tensioned steel cables and resembles a bicycle wheel with many spokes. In December 2006 a new lighting was installed with LEDs manufactured by Color Kinetics that allowed the digital control of the lights as opposed to the manual replacement of the gels in the fluorescent tubes. The Ferris wheel was built in sections that arrived on the Thames in barges and were assembled in lying position on platforms in the river. When completed, it was raised to its final position by a system of hydraulic jacks manufactured by Enerpac. First it rose to 2 degrees per hour until it reached 65 degrees of inclination, and then it was left in that position for a week while the engineers They were preparing for the second phase of the uprising. The project was European and its main components came from six different countries: the steel was supplied by the United Kingdom and manufactured in the Netherlands by the Hollandia company, the cables came from Italy, the bearings from Germany, the shaft that holds the wheel was manufactured in the Czech Republic, the capsules were manufactured by Poma in France (and the glass of these came from Italy), and electrical components in the United Kingdom.
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Building of interest

Foto lejana del Palacio de Westminster y del Big Ben

Everything that follows has been copied from: wikipedia.org The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament in English, houses the two chambers of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons). The palace, which is one of the four World Heritage sites of the city of London, declared by UNESCO in 1987, is located on the north bank of the River Thames, in the city of Westminster, near several government buildings in Whitehall. The palace initially served as a royal residence, but no monarch has lived there since the 16th century. Most of the current structure dates back to the 19th century, when the palace was rebuilt after a fire in 1834, which destroyed most of it. The architects responsible for the reconstruction of the palace were Sir Charles Barry and Augustus Pugin. The building is an example of the neo-Gothic style. One of the most notable features of the palace is the clock tower, another tourist attraction that houses the bell called Big Ben, name mistakenly assigned to the tower clock. The palace contains more than a thousand rooms, the most important being the Halls of the House of Lords and the House of Commons. The palace also includes meeting rooms, libraries, corridors, dining rooms, bars and gyms. It is the place where important state ceremonies are held, of which the most important is the Opening Ceremony of the Parliament. The palace is closely associated with the two Chambers, as evidenced by the use of the word "Westminster" to refer to "Parliament". Parliamentary offices are located in nearby buildings, such as the Portcullis House and the Norman Shaw Buildings.

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