Time  3 minutes

Coordinates 25

Uploaded December 21, 2012

Recorded December 2012

-
-
6,051 ft
5,911 ft
0
0.0
0.0
0.02 mi

Viewed 1774 times, downloaded 10 times

near Guerrero, Guanajuato (Mexico)

Begins at Trail Head parking for Section 1 and stops at the Guanajuato Brige which is the end of Section 2.
Waypoint

Section 1 Trail Head Parking

Trail Head Parking for Section 1
Waypoint

Old Hacienda

This is the old hacienda located miles ( meters) from the trail head parking. Off to the right of the trail and hidden by the trees in the picture. During the seasons when the Presa is very high, it is nearly surrounded by water. Waypoint 2: Abandoned Hacienda, mile .90/meter 1,450 The Abandoned Hacienda, Las Trancas, ruins are slightly visible through the ring of surround trees, NNE of the trail.
Waypoint

END of Section 1/Begin Section 2

This crossing of the river (during low water times only) marks the end of Section1 and the beginning of Section 2 - Trail Head parking for Section 2. Mile ( meters).
Waypoint

Old abandoned bridge ruin

This is at mile ( meters) from the start of Section 2. Here it is necessary to walk up and around the bridge and follow the trail back to the Rio Laja. Waypoint 2: Puente Antigua San Rafael, mile 1.04/1675 meters Arriving at the old bridge which spans half of the Rio Laja, it may be necessary when the water is high to walk up to the roadway level of the bridge and back down to the trail at the top of the bank.
Waypoint

Guanajuato Bridge

This marks the end of Section 2 and the beginning of Section 3 at mile ( meters). Waypoint 3: End of Section 2 and Start of Section 3, mile 1.73/2785 meters (3.9 miles/6280 meters from start of Section 1) at the Guanajuato Bridge

9 comments

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Overall Description:

    The section of the Rio Laja Trail is considered seasonal because during period of high water in the Presa Allende almost half of its distance (from trail head parking to beyond the abandoned hacienda) may be inaccessible by foot. It may be navigate by boat, however. Below describes the trail during the non high water period when it is possible to hike the trail. The ‘trail’ begins where the Rio Laja enters the flood plan of the Presa Allende making a 90 degree turn from north to west.
    Trail blazers generally follow the top of the bank on the left descending bank within the federal zone, however, there is a parallel trail often crossing private land that has been most often used by daily walkers which you may opt to follow. It is often more suitable for biking as the marked trail weaves through groves of willow which are often very thick due to the periods when this land is submerged. Bikers are advised to use the unofficial trail at their own risk of crossing private land where no trail improvements have been made. Watch for the occasional drainage ditch or fallen tree.
    This very beautiful section of the trail parallels the Rio Laja which is usually flowing and with an abundance of water fowl. It passes an abandoned hacienda almost halfway up the trail which is barely visible through a ring of trees surrounding it.
    There are three waypoints in Section 1.

    Access to Trail Head Parking:

    Trail head parking is accessed by crossing the railroad tracks coming from town on Calzada de la Estación. After crossing the tracks bare left (off from the paved road) to the cobblestone road following the signs to the Otomí development. Bare right at the next fork following the signs to Otomí. Immediately after passing the entrance to Otomí on the left, turn right on to the dirt road, turn left at the first intersection and follow this dirt road about a 1000 feet (365 meters)turning right at the second dirt road. Follow this road (staying to the right at the next intersection) for about another 1000 feet to the Trail Head Parking.

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Waypoint 1: Trail head parking, mile/meter: 0.0
    Walk north slightly downhill to the top of the bank of the Rio Laja flowing north to south and making a distinctive 90 degree turn to the west.
    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746617

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Waypoint 2: Abandoned Hacienda, mile .90/meter 1,450
    The Abandoned Hacienda, Las Trancas, ruins are slightly visible through the ring of surround trees, NNE of the trail.
    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746618

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Waypoint 3: End of Section 1 and Start of Section 2, mile 2.17 miles/3,500 meters.
    Section 1 ends at a makeshift river crossing often used by vehicular and foot traffic during dryer periods, but inaccessible during high water.

    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746619

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Section 2
    Alternate Name: Puente Antiguo San Rafael Trail

    Overall Description:
    This section of the Rio Laja Trail is passable at all times of the year and suitable for hiking and mountain biking.
    Trail blazers generally follow the top of the bank on the left descending bank within the federal zone, however, there is occasionally a parallel trail often crossing private land that has been most often used by daily walkers which you may opt to follow. The trail ends at the Guanjuato Bridge where Section 3 starts.
    There are three waypoints in Section 2

    Access to Trail Head Parking:
    From Plazuela de La Estación, cross the tracks and remain on the blacktop road to the left (to Cieneguita) for about .8 miles/1350 meters. Turn left at sign pointing to La Esperanza community. Follow this road straight ahead for 1.8 miles/2900 meters arriving at the Rio Laja. Park off the road in this area.
    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746619

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Waypoint 2: Puente Antigua San Rafael, mile 1.04/1675 meters
    Arriving at the old bridge which spans half of the Rio Laja, it may be necessary when the water is high to walk up to the roadway level of the bridge and back down to the trail at the top of the bank.
    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746620

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Waypoint 3: End of Section 2 and Start of Section 3, mile 1.73/2785 meters (3.9 miles/6280 meters from start of Section 1) at the Guanajuato Bridge /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746621

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Waypoint 1: Section 2, Trail head parking, mile/meter 0.0 (2.17miles/4350 meters from start of Section 1)
    Walk north following trail blazers.
    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746619

  • Photo of mike lambert

    mike lambert Jan 4, 2013

    Section 1

    Alternate Name: Abandoned Hacienda Trail

    Overall Description:

    The section of the Rio Laja Trail is considered seasonal because during period of high water in the Presa Allende almost half of its distance (from trail head parking to beyond the abandoned hacienda) may be inaccessible by foot. It may be navigate by boat, however. Below describes the trail during the non high water period when it is possible to hike the trail. The ‘trail’ begins where the Rio Laja enters the flood plan of the Presa Allende making a 90 degree turn from north to west.
    Trail blazers generally follow the top of the bank on the left descending bank within the federal zone, however, there is a parallel trail often crossing private land that has been most often used by daily walkers which you may opt to follow. It is often more suitable for biking as the marked trail weaves through groves of willow which are often very thick due to the periods when this land is submerged. Bikers are advised to use the unofficial trail at their own risk of crossing private land where no trail improvements have been made. Watch for the occasional drainage ditch or fallen tree.
    This very beautiful section of the trail parallels the Rio Laja which is usually flowing and with an abundance of water fowl. It passes an abandoned hacienda almost halfway up the trail which is barely visible through a ring of trees surrounding it.
    There are three waypoints in Section 1.

    Access to Trail Head Parking:

    Trail head parking is accessed by crossing the railroad tracks coming from town on Calzada de la Estación. After crossing the tracks bare left (off from the paved road) to the cobblestone road following the signs to the Otomí development. Bare right at the next fork following the signs to Otomí. Immediately after passing the entrance to Otomí on the left, turn right on to the dirt road, turn left at the first intersection and follow this dirt road about a 1000 feet (365 meters)turning right at the second dirt road. Follow this road (staying to the right at the next intersection) for about another 1000 feet to the Trail Head Parking.
    /outdoor-trails/the-rio-laja-trail-section-1-and-section-2-3746622#wp-3746617

You can or this trail