Time  5 hours 56 minutes

Coordinates 1574

Uploaded September 11, 2015

Recorded August 2015

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7,237 f
6,348 f
0
2.5
4.9
9.87 mi

Viewed 2697 times, downloaded 169 times

near Pinewood, California (United States)

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We leave the car in the parking lot of the Giant Forest Museum and start, through different routes, one of the most complete days you can have in Sequoia National Park. Complete route in which you can see large specimens of sequoias and sugar pines, bears and a great diversity of flora and fauna.

We start the day by Moro Rock Trail, perfectly indicated trail that will take us to the Moro Rock (2,050 m.), The view to the most spectacular sequoia forest of the park. Along the way, we are lucky to witness the first bear of the day up close, an adult bear, but smaller than the brown bear we can find in Spain. Even so, it is convenient not to disturb this type of animals very much. Some photo and a few minutes watching how he has fun crushing branches and we continue the march. In the vicinity of Moro Rock, we take a detour that will take us to Hanging Rock, an exposed viewpoint that, due to its proximity, is worth visiting and photographing. Continue along the path until you reach the base of Moro Rock, where you have to ascend the 346 steps you have to reach its peak. With a little effort, it's worth it, it's the most beautiful part of the park. From the top you can see the great mountain ranges of the north, Sierra Nevada, Kings Canyon and Giant Forest (forest of giant sequoias). A show for the sight.

We descend in the same way and start the Sugar Pine Trail, where we see large pine trees and where you can witness the strength of wind and fire in this type of forest. On this path we find Triple Tree, 3 giant sequoias that surprise us on the way, something really curious.

After the second trail, we arrive at Crescent Meadow, a large meadow with beautiful views and where we witness the second bear of the day. This specimen is less visible and we can hardly observe what it does, even with binoculars, but its presence indicates the amount of animal life that we can find in this park. We continued the march by Crescent Meadow Loop Trail, surrounding the meadow, and we came to one of the sequoias that most caught our attention: Sequoia Chimney, a sequoia completely scorched by fire and that has managed to stay erect forming a large gap, so of fireplace, inside. There is enough space to get inside the tree, as if you were the sap of it. Amazing! We follow the path and arrive at Tharp's Log, an ancient and singular refuge. You can not enter, but you can see from outside, peek, etc. Curious! We continue a few meters and arrive at Log Meadow, another meadow between so much giant tree. We surround by the north and we finish the path by which we come.

We continue along Trail of the Sequoias, a trail that is not at all traveled, but that communicates through the middle of Giant Forest with the most famous trail in the park: Congress Trail. We decided to continue along the Trail of the Sequoias, in order to get away from the people and enjoy nature in all its splendor, and we did! Great specimens of sequoias and our third bear in front! We were petrified when we saw in front, about 20 meters, an animal of such magnitude. It was not very big, unlike the brown bear, but equally frightening. He had not seen us, but when he looked up and saw us face to face, like a squirrel, he began to run and rushed to a pine tree, standing on all fours on his trunk. We lost our eyes. Us to him either! Amazing the agility of these animals! We must bear in mind that, to this type of animals, you should never turn your back on them. Finishing the trail, we witness Sequoias The Senate, a group of giant trees, Sequoia The President and Sequoia Chief Sequoiah.

Once the previous path is finished, it's time to start the most typical route: Congress Trail. On this route we say goodbye to the flora and fauna and we begin to see people, more people than trees! On this trail we see the group of Sequoias The House and Sequoia McKinley trees. We continue north, without much surprise, to head towards the most attractive point of the park: Sequoia General Sherman. In the vicinity of the point of the park where more people gather, to our surprise, we spotted the fourth bear of the day! This, unlike the rest, was larger and had darker hair. He seemed a much more pleasant bear, who offered no fear and, surely, much more accustomed to people than the rest of the world.

General Sherman is a specimen of Giant Sequoia, related to the genus Sequoia. It is located in Giant Forest, within the Sequoia National Park (National Park of the Redwoods) along with other specimens of similar size. This specimen is considered to be the living being with the largest amount of biomass on Earth. Even with 83.8 meters of height it is far from being the highest (since it occupies the specimen of sequoia called Hyperion with 115.5 m of height), however, it is the tree with the highest net volume due to its trunk perimeter. about 31 m, that is, about 11 m in diameter at the base, which gives an estimated volume (according to measurement standards) of 1486.6 cubic meters. Its bark is more than one meter thick, the length of its branches is from about 40 meters and a weight of more than 2000 tons. For a long time it was believed that this tree was about 3500 years old, but recent studies determined the exact age of 2000 years (it is not the oldest tree in the world). It reproduces by seeds that are inside pineapples. It has a triangle shape and its trunk is reddish brown. In January of 2006 his biggest branch fell, whose diameter was of about 2 meters and its length of more than 30 meters, destroying the fence that surrounds it and the way that leads to him. This breakage was caused by inclement weather, ruling out possible health problems. Each year the diameter of the trunk grows about 1.5 cm.

Once the walking route through the park is finished, we return on the park's free public bus (shuttle), pick it up at the Sherman Tree stop and return to the starting point (Giant Forest Museum).

Impressive the size of the trees, which find in this area the ideal climate and height to develop. A park worth seeing, walking and enjoying. We loved it!

MORE INFORMATION:
Sequoia National Park - Moro Rock Trail - Moro Rock (2,050 m.) - Sugar Pine Trail - Trail of the Sequoias - Congress Trail

ROUTES Index
Map of ROUTES and SUMMITS

R&S Wanderlust (www.randswanderlust.com)

View more external

Tree

Sequoia Sentinel

Sequoia Sentinel
panorama

Hanging Rock

Hanging Rock
Summit

Moro Rock (2.050 m.)

Moro Rock (2.050 m.)
Tree

Triple Tree

Triple Tree
Waypoint

Crescent Meadow

Crescent Meadow
Tree

Sequoia Chimney

Sequoia Chimney
Refuge

Tharp's Log

Tharp's Log
Waypoint

Log Meadow

Log Meadow
Tree

Sequoia Chief Sequoiah

Sequoia Chief Sequoiah
Tree

Sequoia The President

Sequoia The President
Tree

Sequoias The Senate

Sequoias The Senate
Tree

Sequoias The House

Sequoias The House
Tree

Sequoia McKinley

Sequoia McKinley
Tree

Sequoia General Sherman

Sequoia General Sherman

11 comments

  • Photo of 82Pablito

    82Pablito May 25, 2017

    Se podría realizar en sentido contrario?? pros y contras?
    Gracias

  • Photo of RubAlvarez

    RubAlvarez May 25, 2017

    82Pablito, se puede realizar en cualquier sentido perfectamente, sin apenas pros ni contras. Las diferencias serían que verías al principio de tu ruta el principal atractivo (General Sherman) y que al final tendrías que subir Moro Rock, después de unos cuantos kilómetros en las piernas. De todas formas, si lo haces en sentido contrario, la segunda parte de la ruta sería en ligero descenso, más cómodo. En cualquier caso, buena elección! Gracias a ti!

  • Photo of 82Pablito

    82Pablito May 25, 2017

    Ok gracias, lo de hacerlo al reves es por acumular menos desnivel. Me voy a empollar tu blog así que puede que te caiga alguna pregunta mas. Un saludo.

  • Photo of RubAlvarez

    RubAlvarez May 25, 2017

    Eso sí es verdad, el desnivel sería menor, aunque tampoco es nada del otro mundo... Pocos metros para los kilómetros que se hacen. También te quitarías al principio la gran cantidad de gente que se acumula en los alrededores de General Sherman.

  • Photo of RubAlvarez

    RubAlvarez May 25, 2017

    Y en cuanto al blog, a tu disposición para lo que necesites! 82Pablito, saludos!

  • Photo of Eduard-83

    Eduard-83 Jun 29, 2017

    Hola. En esta ruta esta incluido el loop de las sequoias?

    Gracias

  • Photo of RubAlvarez

    RubAlvarez Jun 30, 2017

    Hola Eduard-83! No esta incluida la vuelta circular completa, pero sí la visita, en la parte final de la ruta, a las sequoias más representativas del parque: Chief Sequoiah, The President, The Senate, The House, McKinley, General Sherman. Después de estudiar mucho el parque y toda su extensión y sus distintas sendas, decidimos que esta ruta podría ser la opción más completa para visitar el parque en un día. Espero que te sirva! Saludos!

  • Photo of Eduard-83

    Eduard-83 Jun 30, 2017

    Muchas gracias.

    Tenemos el día completo, si. Sabes si se puede hacer algo rapido por kings canyon bajando del coche y dando un ojo a alguna zona interesante?

    Gracias de antemano!

  • Photo of RubAlvarez

    RubAlvarez Jul 1, 2017

    Hola Eduard-83! No conozco Kings Canyon, así que no te puedo ayudar con ese parque! Saludos!

  • Photo of Eduard-83

    Eduard-83 Jul 1, 2017

    Vale. Gracias. La ruta será suficiente!

    Un saludo!

  • Photo of RubAlvarez

    RubAlvarez Jul 1, 2017

    De nada! Si la completas entera, seguro que sí! Saludos!

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