Time  2 hours

Coordinates 400

Uploaded November 27, 2015

Recorded November 2015

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237 f
-53 f
0
1.1
2.1
4.27 mi

Viewed 1172 times, downloaded 7 times

near Sillery, Québec (Canada)

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Walk Samuel-de-Champlain
Trail of Strikes
Jacques-Cartier Beach Trail
Tracel of Cap-Rouge
Cartier-Roberval Park
St. Lawrence River
Cap Rouge River

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panorama

Promenade Samuel-de-Champlain (Station des Cageux)

Station des Cageux: crossroads of services and observation At the western end of the promenade, the Ceux station offers the population a large gathering place. This station, which revolves around an old rehabilitated industrial wharf, derives its name from the nickname given to woodworkers in the 19th century. A marsh, an observation tower and a descent to the water allow to admire the river from all angles. A pedestrian path meanders along the river's edge, connecting the different stations to each other.
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Information

Sentier des Grèves (point de départ/arrivée)

This trail, a western section of the Samuel-De Champlain Parkway, provides privileged access to Gagnon Beach, one of Québec City's few natural sand beaches. It is punctuated with interpretive panels explaining the transformation of the waterfront landscape and the phenomenon of the tides. Stairs connect the cliff to the beach and alternative routes allow you to walk on the beach at low tide. A special clock, installed at the foot of the stairs of the Chênaie, gives moreover information on the state of the tide. We will have views of the St. Lawrence River, Quebec bridges and the south shore.
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panorama

Promenade Samuel-de-Champlain (Sentier des Grèves, nouveau tronçon aménagé)

PHASE 2 OF THE SAMUEL-DE CHAMPLAIN PROMENADE The 3.1 kilometer project called the Strikes Trail is Phase 2 of the Samuel-De Champlain Parkway. It is a pedestrian link that runs along the river or overhangs the cliff, linking the Quai des Cageux on the Samuel-De Champlain Parkway to the Jacques-Cartier Beach Park.
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Building of interest

Promenade Samuel-de-Champlain jonction Chemin du Foulon

In the 19th century, the Chemin du Foulon is lined with working-class housing, small shops and inns, while the Sillery coves are home to the yards of timber exporters and ship builders, most of them of British origin. It was only much later, in 1924, that the town of Sillery adopted the name of chemin du Foulon, also called Cove Road. As for the Foulon Cove, once its beach freed from industrial facilities, it will be for several decades the appointment of bathers. The construction of Champlain Boulevard, in the 1960s and 1970s, required embankments, which made most of Foulon Road disappear. Today, only a section of it leaves the coast of Sillery and meanders between the cliff and the boulevard to Victoria Cove. Along the way, there is still the Jesuit House and former workers' houses, which evoke, for the first time, the era of New France, for the second, the 19th century and the wood industry. The Foulon Park runs along the path of the same name. Old toponym The Foulon Road was also known as Cove Road ("chemin des anses") because it led to the sites established along the St. Lawrence River.
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Bridge

Promenade Samuel-de-Champlain (Pont de Québec et Pont Pierre-Laporte)

The Quebec Bridge is a mixed railway and road bridge that crosses the St. Lawrence River west of Quebec City (north shore) to Lévis (Saint-Nicolas district) on the south shore. It is a riveted steel structure 987 m long, 28.7 m wide and 104 m high. Each cantilever span is 178 m. It is the longest span freestanding bridge in the world, with 549 meters between its main pillars and a 576 meter long central span. The headroom below its center span is 45.72 meters at high tide and 52.42 meters at low tide. It is still considered today as a major engineering work. It is located downstream from the Pierre Laporte Bridge. The Quebec Bridge is owned by the Canadian National Railway Company (CN). It was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1995.
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Bridge

Promenade Samuel-de-Champlain (Pont Pierre-Laporte)

The Pierre Laporte Bridge is a road bridge that crosses the St. Lawrence River, connecting the cities of Quebec City and Lévis. It has the largest main span of all Canadian suspension bridges1. It is located approximately 200 m west of the Québec Bridge, between the Sainte-Foy-Sillery-Cap-Rouge borough of Quebec (north shore) and the Chutes-de-la-Chaudière-Ouest borough of Lévis (South Shore). The two pylons on the Pierre Laporte Bridge rest on pillars located in the St. Lawrence River. Composed of two cruciform columns, the pylons have a height of 123 m. To facilitate the maintenance of the bridge, elevators are installed inside the North-East and South-West pylons. During the construction of the bridge, the various cells and tower floors are manufactured in the workshop. They are then sent to Quebec City to be assembled on site using self-elevating cranes. The pylons were assembled entirely on November 21, 1968.
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Waterfall

Sentier des Grèves (Escalier #8: une montée d'adrénaline)

THE SECOND SECTION OF THE TRAIL OF STRIKES (2016) This second stretch of trail runs along Champlain Boulevard. This staircase allows a continuous link between the Quai des Cageux and the Jacques-Cartier beach, staircase # 8.
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panorama

Sentier des Grèves (escalier La Cascade)

Near the parking lot, an interpretive sign will teach you a bit more about the place. From the bridge of the waterfall, take the opportunity to admire the two bridges of Quebec and see the waterfall at the bottom of the stairs. Go back up the stairs. The vegetation begins to grow on the steep slope of the Cascade sector staircase.
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Parking

Sentier des Grèves (Stationnement du Domaine-des-Retraités du CN)

Parking: The Strikes Trail is accessible by Jacques-Cartier Beach Park and the CN Pensioners' Domain. Parking is free at both locations.
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panorama

Sentier des Grèves (belvédère Les Ponts)

Your first stop at the belvedere * Les Ponts * will make you discover the river and the south shore of Quebec (Saint-Nicolas). Nearby, begins the descent of the grand staircase with a little less than 200 steps. At the bottom of the stairs is the Maligne Cove, where you can climb the cliff. Continue your way on the Gagnon beach. Follow the formal marked trail or the Gagnon beach on the beach at low tide.
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Beach

Sentier des Grèves (la descente du grand escalier)

Nearby, begins the descent of the grand staircase with a little less than 200 steps. At the bottom of the stairs is the Maligne Cove, where you can climb the cliff. Continue your way on the Gagnon beach. Follow the formal marked trail or the Gagnon beach on the beach at low tide.
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Beach

Sentier des Grèves (Plage Gagnon)

Gagnon Beach, one of the few natural sand beaches in Quebec City. Continue your way on the Gagnon beach. Follow the formal marked trail or the Gagnon beach on the beach at low tide.
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Tree

Sentier des Grèves (escalier Le Boisé des Roches)

Staircase The Boisé des Roches Stairway The snow depot After the wall of Grès, there is a belvedere and the bridge of the Creek.
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panorama

Sentier des Grèves (escalier Le dépôt à neige)

Staircase * The snow depot The staircase that leads to the area called "the snow deposit".
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panorama

Sentier des Grèves (escalier La Paroi de grès: à couper le souffle)

After the wall of Grès, there is a belvedere and the bridge of the Creek. At the end of the Grèves trail make a stop in the Jacques-Cartier Beach Park. Do you have vertigo? Always look at the top
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Ruins

Sentier des Grèves (belvédère et plaque commémorative)

The plaque to the victims of Manseau 101 is installed on a rock overlooking the St. Lawrence River at the Strikes Trail, in front of the place where the wreckage is located today. The dredge Manseau 101, a service vessel involved in the construction of the Pierre-Laporte Bridge, sank on September 30, 1966. She was heading for the construction site of the North Pillar of the future bridge, towed by two tugboats. The sinking, caused by high winds and strong waves, has cost the lives of ten sailors. TEXT OF THE PLATE "In memory of the victims of the sinking of Manseau 101, a dredge that sank in the St. Lawrence River on September 30, 1966. These men were working on the construction of the pillars of the Pierre Laporte Bridge. Réal Bergeron, Victorien Gamelin, Lucien-Aimé Guevremont, Patrick Larosee, Lawrence Monbourquette, Real Parent, Real Parenteau, Alfred Peloquin, Dionisios Phourniotis, Armand Tessier. " EVOLVED RETURN The 41-meter wreckage was formally identified by the historian Samuel Côté in February 2012. It is located more than 30 meters deep, upstream from the Pierre-Laporte bridge, in front of a belvedere on the Grèves trail. This plaque was unveiled at a commemorative event at the foot of the Strike Trail on September 15, 2012. This rally was held in the presence of some survivors of the sinking as well as members of the victims' families. Through this commemorative plaque, the Commission highlights the work of sea craftsmen.
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Building of interest

Sentier des Grèves (escalier La Chênaie)

A special clock, installed at the foot of the stairs of the Chênaie, gives moreover information on the state of the tide. We will have views of the St. Lawrence River, Quebec bridges and the south shore.
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Picnic

Chemin du Pavillon et Plage Jacques-Cartier

Jacques-Cartier Beach Park Rocks are scattered on this beach which is located on the shore of the St. Lawrence River. It offers a beginner walk to the Cap Rouge water park to get to Sainte-Foy. You will be able to observe the tides of the river, the escarpments, the bridges of Quebec and Pierre-Laporte, as well as boats. ACCESS On Saint-Louis Road, in Quebec City, drive west. Cross Highway 573 and follow signs for Parc de la Plage Jacques-Cartier. Turn left on Pavilion Road. A second parking lot is available at Cap-Rouge Water Park, 4155 chemin de la Plage-Jacques-Cartier. From Place D'Youville, take bus 25 and get off at the corner of chemin Saint-Louis and Pavillon. In the steep side of the coast, you can take a side path with stairs.
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Picnic

Chemin de la Plage-Jacques-Cartier (pique-nique)

Beautiful path to go shopping unconventional .. stairs .sentier.plage.gravel .... really beautiful landscape and beautiful place to entertain children on the edge of the beach
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Archaeological site

Site archéologique Cartier-Roberval

The Cartier-Roberval archaeological site is located at the confluence of the Cap-Rouge River and the St. Lawrence River at 4079 Saint-Louis Road, Quebec. This site testifies to the first French colonization in America. More than 6,000 16th century artefacts have been discovered along with the remains of at least five construction sites. Objects and leftovers of luxury foods suggest that a sector was reserved for the elite. The presence of Iroquoian pottery and remnants of native plants testify to exchanges between French and Amerindians. Other objects also reveal that we were actively looking for precious metals. But the site still contains many mysteries that specialists in twenty disciplines try to clarify.
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Park

Parc Cartier-Roberval (Chemin Saint-Louis)

This park is located on the Cap Rouge promontory, which saw Jacques Cartier and Jean-François de LaRocque Roberval build a fort. Although it was abandoned after two years (1541-1543), it was the first attempt at French settlement in America. In fact, two forts were built there: one on the Cape, the other on the current site of the charming church of Cap-Rouge. The first "abitation" before that of Champlain! One can find a pretty gazebo surrounded by perennials, a fountain and an old house. In fact, the adjacent trails are about a kilometer in the forest, with signs informing the visitor about the history and flora of these peaceful places. To get there: On foot, at the intersection Provancher / Côte-de-Cap-Rouge, an impressive wooden staircase awaits you. By car, a small access road on Chemin Saint-Louis, just before the Moraldo Nursery, leads to the parking lot.
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Birding spot

Corridor du Littoral Km 18 (Cap-Rouge, Rue Gaudias-Petitclerc)

The Littoral Corridor is a 48 km multifunctional runway extending from Saint-Augustin-de-Desmaures to Montmorency Falls, connected to the western end of the Samuel-De Champlain Parkway by a 3 km stretch from the Port of Quebec to the coast of Sillery. Nice walk to do not far from the beautiful city of Quebec to enjoy the many attractions of the Capital. To see on the Quai des Cieuses: 25-meter observation tower and interpretation pavilion of the Caves Station on the history of 19th century woodworkers.
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Mountain pass

Côte de Cap-Rouge (escalier et Route Verte #5)

Link linking St. Louis Road to the Cape Red Coast at Cartier-Roberval Park. Staircase equipped with a scupper to ensure the continuity of the cycle network. Green Road # 5 Gradient of 41 meters with slope of 20%.
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Train stop

Cap-Rouge (Viaduc ferroviaire Tracel de Cap-Rouge)

The Cap-Rouge tracel, located in the Cap-Rouge district of Quebec City, Quebec, is a railway viaduct, like a trestle bridge (or trestle bridge), completed in 1908, still in service. In the sky of Cap-Rouge, a century old "TRACEL" We will agree, Cap-Rouge would not be Cap-Rouge without his "tracel". The construction of this viaduct, which is one of the longest and highest in the world, began 100 years ago, in 1906. And its English-speaking builders speaking of a trestle, the Carougeois heard trécel, or tracel, and began to write it this last way.
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Mooring point

Cap-Rouge (Parc Nautique)

Nautical Park of Cap-Rouge 4155, chemin de la plage Jacques-Cartier (Borough of Sainte-Foy-Sillery-Cap-Rouge) Do you have time for a short walk, for a small race, or to escape and enjoy the magnificent landscape that awaits you? The water park is a great place to start dropping off the city. You will have plenty of time to visit either the beach or the stone dust trail that will let you travel a few kilometers along the river. With the breathtaking views of the bridges, you could almost believe yourself in San Francisco with its Golden Gate, but in less exotic ... Some amenities will also allow you to climb an observation tower that gives a nice view of the bay. It must be said that the imposing Tracel is part of the decor, and it is quite remarkable to see this piece of architecture still standing! The nautical park is a place of convergence towards several pedestrian paths.

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