Time  2 hours 49 minutes

Coordinates 948

Uploaded October 2, 2016

Recorded October 2016

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302 f
3 f
0
1.6
3.2
6.31 mi

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near Sillery, Québec (Canada)

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Walk 2 to Quebec City - Ste-Foy-Sillery
Maguire-Champlain-Côte Gilmour-Rene-Levesque O

Sainte-Foy, Quebec
Sainte-Foy is an old Quebec city, located in the Capitale-Nationale region, which was merged on January 1, 2002 in Quebec City, where it now forms part of the district of Sainte-Foy-Sillery-Cap-Rouge.

History
French diet
The existence of Sainte-Foy begins well before the municipal organization. As early as 1638, the Jesuits founded the Notre-Dame-de-Foy mission, which serves settlers living in the western part of the Quebec City hill. The seigniory of Sillery is constituted in 1651, and roughly includes the future territories of Sillery and Sainte-Foy. In 1667, about twenty families settled in the third row of the seigniory of Sillery, called Côte Saint-Michel, crossed by the current Sainte-Foy road3. That same year, Jesuit Father Pierre Chaumonot built a wooden chapel, named Notre-Dame-de-Foy, at the site today occupied by the intersection of Chemin des Quatre-Bourgeois and Autoroute Robert- Bourassa4.
In 1678, a first parish, called Notre-Dame-de-Foy, was erected by Bishop Laval. It includes "Sainte-Foy, Goderville (Gaudarville), Saint-Michel, the road Saint-Ignace and Lorette" 4. This enumeration indicates that the name of Sainte-Foy was already in use to designate a part of the seigniory. This parish did not have a resident parish priest, however, and in 1698, its vast territory prompted Bishop de Saint-Vallier, Bishop of Quebec, to split it in two to create a parish in Lorette and another in Sainte-Foy. term of The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary5. However it is more commonly called Notre-Dame-de-Foy, the name of the chapel that serves. This time, a priest, Charles Amador Martin, is named4. In 1719, a first stone church was built, on land owned by Jacques Pinguet de Vaucour, at the current site of the Park of the Visitation.
The boundaries of the parish are for the first time legally defined by the judgment of the Council of the King of March 3, 1722, as for all the parishes of New France.
War of the Conquest change the code]
Main article: Battle of Sainte-Foy.
On April 28, 1760, the knight François Gaston de Lévis defeated the British of General James Murray in Sainte-Foy and laid siege to Quebec. This victory will have no tomorrow, however, and Murray keeps Quebec.

British diet
After the conquest some properties were acquired by British, including Governor Murray6. In 1845, a law on the municipal organization in Lower Canada established a first municipal corporation for Sainte-Foy, but this law was repealed in 1847. It was not until 1855, with the adoption of a new law municipal, that the parish municipality of Sainte-Foy is established again. Its boundaries will be reduced twice, during the creation of the parish municipality of Saint-Colomb de Sillery in 1856, and the parish municipality of Saint-Félix du Cap-Rouge in 18722. During the nineteenth century, Notables and businessmen acquire estates, build villas and operate farms on the territory of Sainte-Foy. Belmont House, belonging to the Caldwell family, part of which became the Notre-Dame-de-Belmont cemetery6, and the four villas along the road called Chemin des Quatre-Bourgeois: Mapple Cottage (1856), Champlain Villa (1849), Hazel Grove Cottage (1850) and New Prospect (1850).

Modern era
In 1917, the Quebec Bridge connects Sainte-Foy to the south shore of the St. Lawrence River. The parish retains a rural character until the 1940s, while the expansion of the city of Quebec transforms the landscape. The municipality became the city of Sainte-Foy in 1949. Many institutions, civil and religious, settled on the territory of Sainte-Foy during the twentieth. These include the Hospital for TB (future Laval Hospital) in 1918, the Institute Saint-Jean-Bosco in 1923, the Provincial House of the Brothers of the Christian Schools (Pavilion Montcalm) in 1925, the Women's Prison (Gomin House) in 1931 , the provincial house of the Brothers of Saint Vincent de Paul in 1945, and especially the campus of Laval University which began in 1949, shared between the territories of Sainte-Foy and Sillery3.
The opening of boulevard Laurier which leads from downtown Quebec to the bridges allows the accelerated development of trade and hotel establishments.
Administration [edit | change the code]
List of successive mayors
Period Identity Label Quality
1858 1860 Louis Juneau of Monvielle9
1872 1880 François Arteau10
1881 1887 Joseph-Elzéar Bédard11
1915 1926 Honoré Mainguy3
1941 1957 Émile Boiteau12
1966 1973 Roland Beaudin13
1973 1981 Bernardin Morin14
1985 2001 Andrée P. Boucher

Missing data are to be completed.
List of priests of Sainte-Foy change the code]
This section is empty, insufficiently detailed or incomplete. Your help is welcome !
• 1698-1711: Charles-Amador Martin
• 1715-1756: Pierre-Gabriel The Prévost15
• 1756-1774: François Borel16
• 1786-1792: François Borel
Demography
Demographic evolution
1844 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1921 1931 1941 1951
1,273 1,625 1,085 1,034 1,066 1,811 1,622 2,220 2,963 5,976
Demographic change, continuation (1)
1956 1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001
19 073 38 521 63 029 68 385 71 237 68 889 69 615 71 133 72 330 72 547
(Sources: For 1844, Lebel 2008, for the year 1844, for other years, Statistics Canada, Table "The city of Quebec and its environs, 1876 to 2008-135 years of population change")
(See https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sainte-Foy_(Québec))


Sillery, Quebec

Sillery is one of 35 neighborhoods in Quebec City, and one of seven in the Sainte-Foy-Sillery-Cap-Rouge borough. Green and near the city center, it is known to house one of the most exclusive residential areas of Quebec although it includes in some places more modest housing.

Portrait of the neighborhood
Sillery is located along the St. Lawrence River and includes a narrow strip of land at the foot of the cliff of Quebec City Hill, as well as a much larger portion at the top of it. The territory of the district is slightly different from that of the old town of Sillery, integrated in Quebec since January 1, 2002.
The face of the neighborhood is also characterized by huge land between the St. Louis Road and the cliff.
Boulevard René-Lévesque West (formerly known as Saint-Cyrille), separates Sillery from the Saint-Sacrement district, and borders the Saint-Michel-de-Sillery cemetery where former Premier René Lévesque is buried.

Placename
The district and the old city are named in honor of Noël Brulart de Sillery, Knight of Malta, diplomat, French priest and commander of Troyes, who lived between 1557 and 16401. He was interested in "Jesuit Relations in New France "and after donating 40,000 livres, a Jesuit mission was established in St. Joseph's Cove, on the site of the current Jesuit house in Sillery.
Previously, the cape in front of the church of Saint-Michel de Sillery bore the name of Kamiskoua-Ouangachit (French "Pointe-aux-Anguilles").


History
From 1856 to January 1, 2002, Sillery was a city in the suburbs of Quebec City. The first concession at the origin of the domain of the seigniory of Sillery consists of 130 arpents going from the river to the road Saint-Ignace, on which the Jesuits establish their mission from 1637. In 1651, the lands of Sillery are erected in fief and lordship. From a depth of a league and a half, the seigniory of Sillery joined that of Gaudarville, a league upstream on the river. In the nineteenth century, Sillery greatly contributed to the economic development of the region, including the Anse au Foulon where the trade in timber and shipbuilding was practiced. The neighborhood has been inhabited by many premiers and ministers of the province.

Main arteries
• Grande Allée Ouest and Laurier Boulevard (Route 175),
• Chemin Saint-Louis,
• René-Lévesque Boulevard West,
• Champlain Boulevard and Samuel-De Champlain Drive (Route 136),
• Maguire Avenue and Sillery Coast

Parks, green spaces and recreation
• Cataraqui Estate
• Bois-de-Coulonge Park
• Villa Bagatelle
• Quebec Yacht Club
• Samuel-De Champlain Parkway
• Sailboats Park
• Cliff Park

Museums, theaters and exhibition venues
• Villa Bagatelle
• Jesuit House of Sillery, historical and archaeological site, religious heritage and Native American and Inuit art.
• House Hamel-Bruneau

Religious buildings
• Saint-Michel Church of Sillery3 (1854)
• St. Michael's Church (Anglican) 4 (1854)
• Saint-Charles-Garnier Church5 (1947)
• Church of St. Yves6 (1963)
• St. Stephen and St. Vincent's Church7 (1967) since 2011, transfer to the Coptic Orthodox Church [2]
• St. Patrick's Cemetery (Irish Catholic)
• Mount Hermon Cemetery (Protestant)
• Saint-Michel-de-Sillery Cemetery

Sillery is recognized for the large number of Catholic religious communities that have settled on the vast grounds, mostly located between St. Louis Road and the cliff. Some are still there, others have divested themselves of their property:
• Marist fathers
• Augustine Federation of the Mercy of Jesus (sold)
• Missionary Sisters of Our Lady of Africa (sold) 8
• Sisters of Jesus Mary
• Sisters of the Holy Family of Bordeaux (sold)
• Sisters of Saint Joan of Arc
• Missionaries of the Sacred Heart
• Dominican sisters
• Assumptionist Fathers (Canadian Montmartre).
In addition, the administration of the Archdiocese of Quebec is located in Sillery.

Shops and businesses
• Head Office of Industrial Alliance Insurance Company.

Educational places
• School Board of Discoverers:
Saint-Michel School (primary)
Saint-Yves School (primary)
• Private schools
College Jesus-Marie de Sillery
Seminar of Marist Fathers
Saint-Jean-Berchmans School
Montessori School of Quebec inc.
School Vision Sillery inc.
(Cf. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sillery_(Québec))
panorama

Km 0 Paradis

Km 0 Paradis
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Km .1 JCT Géronce-Gariépy

Km .1 JCT Géronce-Gariépy
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Km .3 JCT Bon-Air

Km .3 JCT Bon-Air
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Km .4 JCT René-Lévesque O

Km .4 JCT René-Lévesque O
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Km .6 JCT Maguire

Km .6 JCT Maguire
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Km 1.2 rue Maguire

Km 1.2 rue Maguire
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Km 1.6 Côte de Sillery

Km 1.6 Côte de Sillery
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Km 2.3 Fleuve St-Laurent

Km 2.3 Fleuve St-Laurent
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Km 2.4 Ponts Québec & Pierre Laporte

Km 2.4 Ponts Québec & Pierre Laporte
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Km 3 Promenade Champlain

Km 3 Promenade Champlain
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Km 3.4 Église de Sillery

Km 3.4 Église de Sillery
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Km 3.6 Ville de Québec

Km 3.6 Ville de Québec
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Km 5.2 Quais

Km 5.2 Quais
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Km 5.6 Côte Gilmour

Km 5.6 Côte Gilmour
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Km 5.7 Gilmour

Km 5.7 Gilmour
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Km 5.8 Côte

Km 5.8 Côte
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Km 6.1 JCT De Laune

Km 6.1 JCT De Laune
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Km 6.7 JCT rue Montcalm

Km 6.7 JCT rue Montcalm
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Km 7 JCT Grande Allée vs Bougainville

Km 7 JCT Grande Allée vs Bougainville
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Km 7.3 JCT René-Lévesque O

Km 7.3 JCT René-Lévesque O
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Km 8.5 René-Lévesque O

Km 8.5 René-Lévesque O
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Km 9.5 JCT Maguire

Km 9.5 JCT Maguire
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Km 10.1 Fin Paradis

Km 10.1 Fin Paradis

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