Moving time  3 hours 6 minutes

Time  6 hours

Coordinates 1236

Uploaded November 23, 2019

Recorded November 2019

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3,584 f
2,706 f
0
1.0
2.0
4.07 mi

Viewed 98 times, downloaded 3 times

near Ágios Konstantínos, Eparchía Lemesoú (Cyprus)

Well marked trail even in the village there is many sign post to direct You to the right place. Google map almost know where you have to left paved road :) Above the beautiful white church you can find a narrow paved road that is goes there from one direction, other direction also available.
You can left you car at several point in the village if you want to park to the trail close as possible drive well a very good 4x4 car and be experienced. Unpaved road is sleepers, due small little stones don't even try without low gear and 4x4. Wide enough to handle opposite traffic if may happen.

At the end the Eagle's Nest is so beautiful rock formation, must see place. Track is easy to follow and moderate almost continuous uphill track.

Trail start in famous Kommandaria vine village Agios Konstantinos

Commandaria (also called Commanderia and Coumadarka; Greek: κουμανδαρία, κουμανταρία and Cypriot Greek κουμανταρκά[1]) is an amber-coloured sweet dessert wine made in the Commandaria region of Cyprus on the foothills of the Troödos mountains. Commandaria is made from sun-dried grapes of the varieties Xynisteri and Mavro. While often a fortified wine, through its production method it often reaches high alcohol levels, around 15%, already before fortification. It represents an ancient wine style documented in Cyprus back to 800 BC and has the distinction of being the world's oldest named wine still in production, with the name Commandaria dating back to the crusades in the 12th century.

The wine has a long history, said to date back to the time of the ancient Greeks, where it was a popular drink at festivals. A dried grape wine from Cyprus was first known to be described in 800 BC by the Greek poet Hesiod and was known, by much later, as the Cypriot Manna.[2][3]


Commandaria by KEO
During the crusades, Commandaria was served at the 12th-century wedding of King Richard the Lionheart to Berengaria of Navarre, in the town of Limassol; it was during the wedding that King Richard pronounced Commandaria "the wine of kings and the king of wines".[4] Near the end of the century he sold the island to the Knights Templar, who then sold it to Guy de Lusignan, but kept a large feudal estate at Kolossi, close to Limassol, to themselves. This estate was referred to as "La Grande Commanderie". The word Commanderie referred to the military headquarters whilst Grande helped distinguish it from two smaller such command posts on the island, one close to Paphos (Phoenix) and another near Kyrenia (Templos). This area under the control of the Knights Templar (and subsequently the Knights Hospitaller) became known as Commandaria.[5] When the knights began producing large quantities of the wine for export to Europe's royal courts and for supplying pilgrims en route to the holy lands, the wine assumed the name of the region. Thus it has the distinction of being the world's oldest named wine still in production.[6][7][8]

Although today it is produced and marketed under the name Commandaria, it has been referred to with several similar names and spellings in the past. In 1863, Thomas George Shaw in his book Wine, the vine, and the cellar refers to this wine as Commanderi[9] whilst in 1879, Samuel Baker refers to it as Commanderia.[10] In 1833 Cyrus Redding in his book "A history and description of modern wines" makes reference to the wine of the "Commandery".[11]

Legend has it that in the 13th century Philip Augustus of France held the first ever wine tasting competition. The event, branded The Battle of the Wines (fr. La Bataille des Vins), was recorded in a notable French poem written by Henry d'Andeli in 1224.[12] The competition which included wines from all over Europe and France, was won by a sweet wine from Cyprus widely believed to be Commandaria.[13] The Commandery region itself fell into the control of his descendant Philip IV in 1307, after the suppression of the Knights Templar.

Another legend has it that the Ottoman sultan Selim II invaded the island just to acquire Commandaria; also that the grapes used to make this wine were the same grapes exported to Portugal that eventually became famous as the source of port wine.[14]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commandaria

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Intersection

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Last point to park your car

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Bench

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Strawberry tree

You can eat tasty fruits at several points of the trail, soft touch deep red is the best.
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Scenic route

Intersection

Water Spring

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Eagle's Nest

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Eagle's Nest

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Eagle's Nest

panorama

Eagle's Nest

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Beautiful Sundown

Comments

    You can or this trail