Time  3 hours 54 minutes

Coordinates 2427

Uploaded October 5, 2015

Recorded October 2015

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387 f
-20 f
0
6.7
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26.62 mi

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near Sillery, Quebec (Canada)

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Sainte-Foy, Quebec

Sainte-Foy is an old Quebec city, located in the Capitale-Nationale region, which was merged on January 1, 2002 in Quebec City, where it now forms part of the district of Sainte-Foy-Sillery-Cap-Rouge.

History
French diet
The existence of Sainte-Foy begins well before the municipal organization. As early as 1638, the Jesuits founded the Notre-Dame-de-Foy mission, which serves settlers living in the western part of the Quebec City hill. The seigniory of Sillery is constituted in 1651, and roughly includes the future territories of Sillery and Sainte-Foy. In 1667, about twenty families settled in the third row of the seigniory of Sillery, called Côte Saint-Michel, crossed by the current Sainte-Foy road3. That same year, Jesuit Father Pierre Chaumonot built a wooden chapel, named Notre-Dame-de-Foy, at the site today occupied by the intersection of Chemin des Quatre-Bourgeois and Autoroute Robert- Bourassa4.
In 1678, a first parish, called Notre-Dame-de-Foy, was erected by Bishop Laval. It includes "Sainte-Foy, Goderville (Gaudarville), Saint-Michel, the road Saint-Ignace and Lorette" 4. This enumeration indicates that the name of Sainte-Foy was already in use to designate a part of the seigniory. This parish did not have a resident parish priest, however, and in 1698, its vast territory prompted Bishop de Saint-Vallier, Bishop of Quebec, to split it in two to create a parish in Lorette and another in Sainte-Foy. term of The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary5. However it is more commonly called Notre-Dame-de-Foy, the name of the chapel that serves. This time, a priest, Charles Amador Martin, is named4. In 1719, a first stone church was built, on land owned by Jacques Pinguet de Vaucour, at the current site of the Park of the Visitation.
The boundaries of the parish are for the first time legally defined by the judgment of the Council of the King of March 3, 1722, as for all the parishes of New France.
War of the Conquest change the code]
Main article: Battle of Sainte-Foy.
On April 28, 1760, the knight François Gaston de Lévis defeated the British of General James Murray in Sainte-Foy and laid siege to Quebec. This victory will have no tomorrow, however, and Murray keeps Quebec.

British diet
After the conquest some properties were acquired by British, including Governor Murray6. In 1845, a law on the municipal organization in Lower Canada established a first municipal corporation for Sainte-Foy, but this law was repealed in 1847. It was not until 1855, with the adoption of a new law municipal, that the parish municipality of Sainte-Foy is established again. Its boundaries will be reduced twice, during the creation of the parish municipality of Saint-Colomb de Sillery in 1856, and the parish municipality of Saint-Félix du Cap-Rouge in 18722. During the nineteenth century, Notables and businessmen acquire estates, build villas and operate farms on the territory of Sainte-Foy. Belmont House, belonging to the Caldwell family, part of which became the Notre-Dame-de-Belmont cemetery6, and the four villas along the road called Chemin des Quatre-Bourgeois: Mapple Cottage (1856), Champlain Villa (1849), Hazel Grove Cottage (1850) and New Prospect (1850) 8.

Modern era
In 1917, the Quebec Bridge connects Sainte-Foy to the south shore of the St. Lawrence River. The parish retains a rural character until the 1940s, while the expansion of the city of Quebec transforms the landscape. The municipality became the city of Sainte-Foy in 1949. Many institutions, civil and religious, settled on the territory of Sainte-Foy during the twentieth. These include the Hospital for TB (future Laval Hospital) in 1918, the Institute Saint-Jean-Bosco in 1923, the Provincial House of the Brothers of the Christian Schools (Pavilion Montcalm) in 1925, the Women's Prison (Gomin House) in 1931 , the provincial house of the Brothers of Saint Vincent de Paul in 1945, and especially the campus of Laval University which began in 1949, shared between the territories of Sainte-Foy and Sillery3.
The opening of boulevard Laurier which leads from downtown Quebec to the bridges allows the accelerated development of trade and hotel establishments.
Administration [edit | change the code]
List of successive mayors
Period Identity Label Quality
1858 1860 Louis Juneau of Monvielle9
1872 1880 François Arteau10
1881 1887 Joseph-Elzéar Bédard11
1915 1926 Honoré Mainguy3
1941 1957 Émile Boiteau12
1966 1973 Roland Beaudin13
1973 1981 Bernardin Morin14
1985 2001 Andrée P. Boucher

Missing data are to be completed.
List of priests of Sainte-Foy change the code]
This section is empty, insufficiently detailed or incomplete. Your help is welcome !
• 1698-1711: Charles-Amador Martin
• 1715-1756: Pierre-Gabriel The Prévost15
• 1756-1774: François Borel16
• 1786-1792: François Borel
Demography
Demographic evolution
1844 1871 1881 1891 1901 1911 1921 1931 1941 1951
1,273 1,625 1,085 1,034 1,066 1,811 1,622 2,220 2,963 5,976
Demographic change, continuation (1)
1956 1961 1966 1971 1976 1981 1986 1991 1996 2001
19 073 38 521 63 029 68 385 71 237 68 889 69 615 71 133 72 330 72 547
(Sources: For 1844, Lebel 2008, for the year 1844, for other years, Statistics Canada, Table "The city of Quebec and its environs, 1876 to 2008-135 years of population change")
(See https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sainte-Foy_(Québec))

L'Ancienne-Lorette
L'Ancienne-Lorette is a city of Quebec, located in the agglomeration of Quebec in the administrative region of the Capitale-Nationale.
From January 1, 2002 to January 1, 2006, L'Ancienne-Lorette was part of Quebec City. By referendum, residents decided to reconstitute the old municipality on June 20, 2004, with 61.7% of voters and 40.9% of those in favor of the demerger. The territory of the city is now completely enclosed in that of Quebec City. The Rivières borough borders it on the east side, and the Sainte-Foy-Sillery-Cap-Rouge borough on all the other sides.

History
During the French regime, in 1674, Father Pierre Chaumonot (1611-1693), a Jesuit, built a chapel on the site of the current cemetery of the city. This chapel serves the Hurons who came to take refuge near Quebec City following a war against the Iroquois who had almost decimated their people. Because he had been cured of a serious illness following a pilgrimage to the Italian shrine of Loreto, Fr. Chaumonot placed the young mission under the patronage of Our Lady of the Annunciation, and the place bears familiarly the name of Loreto.
When the Hurons left Lorette in 1697 to settle in a more favorable place for hunting and fishing, and that will be called the Young Loreto, their old village will take the name of Old Loreto or L'Ancienne-Lorette . It is under this name that it will continue to develop, this time with French settlers.
It was not until 1948 that the village municipality was created under the name Notre-Dame-de-Lorette. In 1967 she obtained the status of city and took the name of L'Ancienne-Lorette. However, the post office had been known as Ancienne-Lorette since 1854.
The city has been part of the Communauté urbaine de Québec since the beginning of this organization in the 1960s. By decision of the Quebec government, it was merged in Quebec as part of Québec municipal reorganizations in 2001 (effective January 1, 2002). On June 20, 2004 the citizens of the municipality decided to demerge, following a referendum promised by the government of Jean Charest during the 2003 election campaign.

Demography
Demographic evolution
1996 2001 2004 2005 2006 2011 2014
16,094 16,241 16,653 16,688 16,516 16,745 16,902
Demographic information is taken from the Quebec Institute of Statistics and Statistics Canada1.
The city of L'Ancienne-Lorette has an area of ​​7.63 square kilometers.

Events
• The Lorettain Festival, in mid-August, is a family day that ends with a performance by a Quebec star of song and fireworks. It is also an opportunity to meet some thirty organizations with an on-site kiosk;
• The trade fair, merged with the Lorettain Festival, is an opportunity to make known the multitude and quality of products and services available in L'Ancienne-Lorette through the association of business people (website).
• The figure skating show (CPA of the Ancienne lorette). It takes place once every two years. This show is organized by the Old Lorette Figure Skating Club Steering Committee, which encourages its members to showcase their team spirit and their artistic and athletic skills.

Education
The Commission scolaire des Découvreurs manages the public schools of L'Ancienne-Lorette. These schools are:
• Primary schools
High Belltower (Notre Dame and Saint Charles Pavilions)
The Ruisselet
• Secondary school
• Versatile of L'Ancienne-Lorette
• Adult Education Center
Flight Center

Airport
The Quebec City Airport (YQB), known as the Quebec City Jean Lesage International Airport, has long been known as L'Ancienne-Lorette Airport because it is located on a territory west of the current city. , formerly part of L'Ancienne-Lorette but annexed by Sainte-Foy in 1971.

Publications
The city of L'Ancienne-Lorette publishes, 11 times a year, its municipal newspaper called Le Lorettain, which is distributed free of charge to all households in the municipality.
The main publications on Ancienne-Lorette are:
• Lionel Allard (1911-1994), L'Ancienne Lorette, Leméac, Montreal, 1979, 386 pages: illustrations, maps, plans, 23 cm, (ISBN 2-7609-5035-2);
• Jean-Yves Dugas, On the Roads to Loreto History: [origin of the street names of L'Ancienne-Lorette], Sainte-Adèle, 2009, in re-edition, 189 pages: maps, 22 cm.

Lorettains known
The city of L'Ancienne-Lorette saw the birth of three professional players of the National Hockey League, Mario Marois in honor of whom we named the former arena of the city: Amphiglace Mario Marois. Patrice Bergeron, Boston Bruins striker and Simon Gagné, Philadelphia Flyers are also from this city.
Élise Marcotte is a synchronized swimmer who won several medals, including two gold medals at the World Cup in 2010. She is fourth at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London (duet and team). The building housing the pool of L'Ancienne-Lorette is called AquaGym Élise Marcotte.
Jonathan Paquet, baseball pitcher who has been drafted by the Phillies is also from Ancienne-Lorette.
As we go back in time, we see the Jesuit father Pierre-Joseph-Marie Chaumonot, the painter Antoine Plamondon and the minister Wilfrid Hamel who became mayor of Quebec.
(See https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%27Ancienne-Lorette)

Old Quebec

Old Quebec is the historic heart of Quebec City. This is where the founder Samuel de Champlain built the Habitation in 1608.Today, it is very strong tourist vocation and is recognized throughout the planet. It is located near downtown Quebec City. The geography of the place is decisive: Cap Diamant dominates the St. Lawrence River at the edge of which is a strip of low land1. At the top of the cape stands the "Haute-Ville" while at the foot of it is "Basse-Ville" 2. Everything is brought together by the concept of the "heritage site of Old Quebec".

High City
Chosen by Champlain in 1620 to set up Fort Saint-Louis, the Haute-Ville took on a military and administrative character from the beginning of the colony: the strategic heights of Cap Diamant determined its vocation. The Upper Town is inhabited by soldiers, civil servants and clergy, while the Lower Town is populated by tradesmen and craftsmen.
The strong military presence in this neighborhood has long limited its expansion. Also, at the end of the nineteenth century. many wanted to demolish the fortifications, judging them useless and hindering even urban development. Governor Dufferin will convince officials to preserve the character of the walled city, while adapting the space to the needs of a modern city and embellishing it3.
After having suffered a certain degradation during the 1950s, the neighborhood has been experiencing a new impetus since the 1970s.
Ramparts, citadel, houses of another century, squares and historic places, rich is the heritage of Old Quebec-Haute-Ville. The legacy of previous generations and the beauty of the place make it a unique place.
Most buildings in the neighborhood date back to the nineteenth century. The construction of some dates back even to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The place has several commercial streets, including Saint-Jean, Sainte-Anne and De Buade Streets. Public administration and institutions still occupy a prominent place in the heart of the city. Buildings bear witness to this: the Town Hall, the Seminary, the Ursuline Convent, the Notre-Dame Cathedral, the Augustinian Monastery, the Hôtel-Dieu. As Old Quebec is one of the most sought-after tourist destinations, there are also several accommodations, including the famous Château Frontenac.
Many well-developed parks also crisscross the territory. Among them, the parks Esplanade, Artillery, Governors, Montmorency Park and the gardens of the Hotel-de-Ville. Walkers and hikers can also enjoy Place D'Youville and the Dufferin Terrace, which offers a grand view of the St. Lawrence River.

• Old Quebec
• Quebec City Hall and Price Building on the right
• Parade


Colonial houses near the citadel, with the Château Frontenac in the background.

Lowertown
Lower Town is a historic center at the foot of Cap Diamant. As early as 1608, Samuel de Champlain had a house built there, the remains of which have recently been found at Place Royale. This square has been restored with the aim of restoring the French spirit of its origins. At this point stands the Church of Our Lady of Victories whose construction began in 1687.
Museums, theaters, theaters and exhibition venues include the Musée de la civilization, the Musée Naval de Québec, the Dalhousie Barracks and the Petit Champlain Theater.
At the Port of Quebec, we recognize the Louise Basin, the Brown Basin, the Pointe à Carcy, the Palais Station and the Old Port Market.
Other notable places: the Place de Paris, Ulric-Joseph-Tessier Park, Saint-Pierre Street, Saint-Paul Street, Sault-au-Matelot Street and Saint-Vallier Street East, former Saint-Pierre Street. Charles, first paved street in Quebec.
From Petit-Champlain street, very narrow, at the foot of Cap Diamant, a funicular with a view can easily go up over Cap Diamant. Another option for walkers: the Côte de la Montagne.

• Quebec, Lower Town, 1903
• Old Quebec on the St. Lawrence River
• Cape Blanc and Cape Diamond


View of the Port of Quebec and Louise Basin.

Heritage site
The heritage site of Old Quebec is part of the territory of Quebec City recognized as a cultural heritage of Quebec and part of World Heritage4. Administratively, it is part of the district La Cité-Limoilou

History
The borough was created by the National Assembly of Quebec on July 10, 1963 by an amendment to the Historic Monuments Act. The protected perimeter has been delimited in two stages. The first route included the fortified city and its surroundings by the river. A second definitive route, set on May 6, 1964, added surrounding spaces5. It covers an area of ​​1.4 km2.
On December 3, 1985, UNESCO declared the district a World Heritage Site.

Preparation
The historic district was created following public debates, between 1945 and 1956, on the preservation of Old Quebec and on the restoration of Place Royale.
The February 1956 Act grants the Historic Monuments Commission the power to acquire or expropriate "any historic building of a national character".
At this time, Gérard Morisset and L'Action catholique, demand that the whole of Old Quebec be declared a historic monument.

Description
Quebec is a site where a capital is born. It consists of two sets:
• a port city on the banks of the St. Lawrence River and the Saint-Charles River,
• an institutional city on the heights of Cap aux Diamants, stronghold.

• View from Laval University (Quebec Seminary), 1895
• The daredevil staircase around 1870, by Louis-Prudent Vallée
• Quebec: Lord Dufferin's plans for the preservation of his historic monuments. Saint John Gate.
(Cf. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vieux-Québec)
Intersection

Km 0 JCT Myrand vs René-Lévesque O

Km 0 JCT Myrand vs René-Lévesque O
Intersection

Km .6 Université Laval JCT du Séminaire

Km .6 Université Laval JCT du Séminaire
Intersection

Km 1.6 JCT ch Ste-Foy

Km 1.6 JCT ch Ste-Foy
Intersection

Km 1.9 JCT Quatre-Bourgeois

Km 1.9 JCT Quatre-Bourgeois
panorama

Km 4.1 Gare d'autocars de Sainte-Foy

Km 4.1 Gare d'autocars de Sainte-Foy
panorama

Km 5.7 Piste Quatre-Bourgeois

Km 5.7 Piste Quatre-Bourgeois
Intersection

Km 8.1 JCT ch Ste-Foy vs Versant Nord

Km 8.1 JCT ch Ste-Foy vs Versant Nord
panorama

Km 8.4 Piste Versant Nord

Km 8.4 Piste Versant Nord
panorama

Km 9.9 Piste

Km 9.9 Piste
Intersection

Km 11.1 vers Base de plein air

Km 11.1 vers Base de plein air
panorama

Km 11.2 Traverse

Km 11.2 Traverse
panorama

11.5 Piste Blaise-Pascal

11.5 Piste Blaise-Pascal
Intersection

Km 11,9 JCT Einstein

Km 11,9 JCT Einstein
panorama

Km 12.2 Base de plein air

Km 12.2 Base de plein air
Intersection

Km 13.7 JCT Jules-Verne

Km 13.7 JCT Jules-Verne
Intersection

Km 14 JCT Autoroute Duplessis

Km 14 JCT Autoroute Duplessis
Intersection

Km 14.6 JCT Boul Wilfrid-Hamel

Km 14.6 JCT Boul Wilfrid-Hamel
Intersection

Km 15.2 JCT Notre-Dame

Km 15.2 JCT Notre-Dame
Intersection

Km 15.4 JCT Saint-Paul

Km 15.4 JCT Saint-Paul
Intersection

Km 17.3 JCT Michelet

Km 17.3 JCT Michelet
Intersection

Km 18 JCT Laurin

Km 18 JCT Laurin
Intersection

Km 18.5 JCT Père-Lelièvre

Km 18.5 JCT Père-Lelièvre
Intersection

Km 19.3 JCT Neuvialle

Km 19.3 JCT Neuvialle
Intersection

Km 20.2 JCT Autoroute 40

Km 20.2 JCT Autoroute 40
Intersection

Km 20.6 JCT Boul Lebourgneuf

Km 20.6 JCT Boul Lebourgneuf
panorama

Km 21.4 Piste Lebourgneuf

Km 21.4 Piste Lebourgneuf
panorama

Km 22.3 Tunel Lebourgneuf

Km 22.3 Tunel Lebourgneuf
Intersection

Km 24.2 JCT Pierre-Bertrand

Km 24.2 JCT Pierre-Bertrand
panorama

Km 25.5 JCT Route verte 6

Km 25.5 JCT Route verte 6
panorama

Km 28.2 Piste

Km 28.2 Piste
panorama

Km 29.6 Piste

Km 29.6 Piste
panorama

Km 30.6 Piste Henri-Bourassa

Km 30.6 Piste Henri-Bourassa
panorama

Km 31.2 Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus

Km 31.2 Hôpital de l'Enfant-Jésus
panorama

Km 31.8 Route verte 6

Km 31.8 Route verte 6
Intersection

32.4 JCT Route verte 5

32.4 JCT Route verte 5
panorama

Km 32.8 Piste

Km 32.8 Piste
panorama

Km 33.4 Rivière Saint-Charles

Km 33.4 Rivière Saint-Charles
panorama

Km 33.7 Piste et Rivière

Km 33.7 Piste et Rivière
panorama

Km 36 Rivière

Km 36 Rivière
panorama

Km 37.2 Étang

Km 37.2 Étang
Bridge

Km 38.3 Pont Scott

Km 38.3 Pont Scott
Intersection

Km 38.4 JCT Saint-Vallier Ouest

Km 38.4 JCT Saint-Vallier Ouest
Intersection

Km 39.4 JCT Saint-Sacrement

Km 39.4 JCT Saint-Sacrement
Photo

Km 39.5 Tunel

Km 39.5 Tunel
panorama

Km 40.5 JCT Boul de l'Entente

Km 40.5 JCT Boul de l'Entente
panorama

Km 41.3 Cégep Garneau

Km 41.3 Cégep Garneau
Intersection

Km 41.7 JCT ch Ste-Foy vs av du Bon-Air

Km 41.7 JCT ch Ste-Foy vs av du Bon-Air
Intersection

Km 41.9 JCT Hélène-Boullé

Km 41.9 JCT Hélène-Boullé
Intersection

Km 42 JCT Rochette

Km 42 JCT Rochette
Intersection

Km 42.2 JCT de la Somme

Km 42.2 JCT de la Somme
Intersection

Km 42.3 JCT Myrand

Km 42.3 JCT Myrand
Intersection

Km 42.8 Fin JCT René-Lévesque

Km 42.8 Fin JCT René-Lévesque

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