Time  5 hours 20 minutes

Coordinates 3496

Uploaded August 6, 2016

Recorded August 2016

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180 f
16 f
0
7.2
14
28.64 mi

Viewed 411 times, downloaded 0 times

near Souris, Illa del Príncep Eduard (Canada)

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Prince Edward Island or PEI (English: Prince Edward Island or PEI, Scottish Gaelic: Eilean a 'Phrionnsa, Mi'kmaq: Epekwitk (Francis-Smith)) is the smallest of Canada's provinces in terms of area and population. In 1864, Prince Edward Island hosted the Charlottetown Conference that led to Canadian Confederation in 1867. Nevertheless, it did not become a Canadian province until 1873. In the 2011 census, one it has a population of 140,204. At 24.7 people per square kilometer, it is the most densely populated province in Canada.

Climate
The climate of Prince Edward Island is humid continental that is, there is a big temperature difference between the cold months and the hot months. During the winter, the temperature can go down to -28 ° C.

Fauna and flora
The forest covers 50% of the area but the primary forest, consisting mainly of spruce, balsam fir and red maple, occupies only 290,000 hectares. Three centuries of colonization, along with forest diseases and fires, have almost wiped out the original forest of beech, yellow birch, maple, oak and American white pine1.
Prince Edward Island has a wide variety of wildlife including beaver, muskrat, mink, red fox, squirrel, snowshoe hare, striped skunks and coyotes. The territory is also rich in marine species.
Conservation of the environment has become an important issue. The removal of hedgerows, the use of chemical fertilizers, mechanization and agricultural overproduction in general are causing significant erosion of arable land leading to the silting up of ports and watercourses1. Some reforestation activities have been carried out1.
The North Atlantic right whale, one of the rarest whale species, was considered a rare visitor to the St. Lawrence until 1994. Since then, there has been a dramatic increase in numbers: off Perce in 1995, a progressive increase in all regions since 19984, around Cape Breton5 since 2014 and in Prince Edward Island, 35 to 40 whales were observed in 20156.


Natural Resources, Industry and Services
The island is poor in natural resources. No significant deposits of ore have yet been discovered but there are traces of coal, uranium and vanadium1. Natural gas is present in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, northeast of the Island, but is not large enough to be exploited1. Only sand and gravel are mined, but poor low quality production does not even meet provincial needs1. The forest is little exploited1.
Half of the island is very fertile land while arable land covers 90% of the area1. Until the 1950s, most farmers used horses, but the end of this practice freed up vast land previously used for fodder cultivation. From 1951 to 1996, the number of farms increased from 10,137 to 2,217 while the area under cultivation decreased by 39%. The average farm size has increased from 44 hectares to 119 hectares, while farmers' profit margins have dropped from 50% to 25% due to the increased cost of the equipment1. Governments are trying to curb the rural exodus while farms are becoming more expensive to start. Although agricultural production is declining, clearing continues. Agricultural production was valued at $ 317 million in 2000, of which $ 154 million was from potatoes1. The island has indeed a climate and a soil well adapted to this culture, and in particular for the production of seed potatoes. Three-quarters of the harvest is exported to 15 countries and the remainder is sold as is in North America or processed into frozen products such as french fries1. Tobacco, planted since 1959, is the second most important crop, despite the high cost and complexity of its production1. The province has 330 dairy farms and a herd of 16,000 cows producing 90 million liters of milk annually, 90% of which is processed into by-products, such as evaporated milk, generally for export1. 30,000 cattle are also sent to the slaughterhouse annually, although the price of meat fluctuates and production is down1. Pig farming is almost as important.
Fishing is the second primary industry on the Island. There were 6,500 fishermen and fish harvesters in 1994, working on 1,500 boats and creating 2,000 direct jobs in factories that processed fish valued at $ 139 million in 2000.1 The fishery is mostly coastal and the lobster is the most lucrative species1. Other molluscs are also caught, including scallops, oysters, clams and mussels. Oysters, whose production is concentrated in Malpeque Bay, are reputed1. Harvesting Irish moss, from which carrageenan is extracted, is an important industry west of the island1.
The manufacturing industry is mainly focused on the processing of fishery and agricultural products. This sector of the economy provided 4,800 jobs in 1997 while the value of production was valued at $ 1.1 billion in 20001. Major manufacturers include Cavendish Farms, DME International and McCain Foods. The government is trying to attract other types of industries, without any real success1. Some companies are still worthy of note include JD Irving, who operates a shipyard in Georgetown.
More and more people are working in services; governments employed 6,000 people in 19991.

Energy
Islanders are the most expensive to pay for electricity in Canada1. Summerside has a municipal distribution network while Maritime Energy distributes electricity to the rest of the island. Most of the electricity is imported from NB Power (New Brunswick) or Emera Energy Systems (Nova Scotia) via submarine cable. However, Maritime Energy has two thermal generating stations, one in Charlottetown and one in Borden-Carleton, operating at peak hours or in the event of a power outage and having an installed capacity of 104 megawatts (MW). Up to 54 MW can also be purchased from wind farms at Cape North or Eastern Kings Wind Farm.
Fuel oil is also very expensive, which encourages more and more people to heat their homes with wood. Although forests are not as exploited as in the nineteenth century, this industry creates more than 400 jobs.

Transport
Charlottetown Airport.
Main article: Transportation to Prince Edward Island.
The Confederation Bridge connects the island to the mainland. 12.9 km long, it is the longest bridge in the world to cross a stretch of frozen water in winter1. One ferry connects the island to Nova Scotia and another to the Îles de la Madeleine (Quebec).
An intercity bus service connects major cities, while Charlottetown has a public transit system, the Charlottetown Public Transit, consisting of 7 bus lines.
Charlottetown Airport offers scheduled flights to Halifax, Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Detroit and Boston. A second, smaller airport is in Summerside.
The railway was dismantled in 1989, after 114 years of existence. It has been converted into a bicycle path, the Confederation Trail, which consists of a portion of the Trans Canada Trail.

(See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince-Edouard Island)


Souris is a city in Prince Edward Island, Canada. In the 2006 census, there was a population of 1 2321. In 2011, the population decreased to 1,1732. Souris is a port in northeastern Kings County, Prince Edward Island. The village is located in an area known for its beaches and potatoes, having the majority of the province's potato plants.

History
The region was colonized by the Acadians in 1727 and was named Mouse following mouse invasions around the 1750s. Today, the Acadian presence is still noticeable to those who recognize the translation of ancient Acadian names. and French: Chiasson became Chaisson; the Daigle, Deagle; Bourque, Burke; Long Sword, Longuaphee; the Pitre, Peters; Leblanc, White; etc.
Since the 1960s, Souris has hosted the inter-provincial ferry terminal for the service of the Magdalen Islands of the province of Quebec. The MV Madeleine is controlled by the Co-operative Maritime and Air Transport (CTMA).
The village is home to several historic buildings, including the Matthew and MacLean Building, the Souris and Post Office Customs Building and the McQuaid Building.

Demography
There were 1,232 inhabitants in 2006 compared with 1,296 in 1996, a decrease of 5% in ten years. About 10% of the population is Francophone according to data from the government agency Statistics Canada.
Demographic evolution
1991
1996
2001
2006
2011
1,333 1,296 1,248 1,232 1,173

Economy
After living from shipbuilding until the end of the 19th century, Souris's economy is now linked to fishing (including lobster fishing), agriculture and tourism.
The port is also the embarkation point for the Îles-de-la-Madeleine.
Tourism is also an important part of the economy of this port city.
There are several industrial businesses and shops. The village has banks, pharmacies, cafes, restaurants, gas stations, a grocery store and other independent merchants.

Education
Since 2011, Souris has two schools serving a Kindergarten to Grade 12 clientele: an English and a French school. In that year, the provincial government endorsed a request from the school board requesting the demolition of Souris Consolidated School and the amalgamation of its grades 1 to 7 classes in grades 8 to 12 year of Souris Regional High School. The new entity is now known as Souris Regional School6.
As for her, La-Belle-Cloche School is the only French-language school in Kings County. It teaches all levels, from kindergarten to grade 12, to children who are entitled to it7 and to children of anglophone parents who choose to have their child educated in Canada's other official language. It is estimated that about 10% of the city's population is Francophone.
In 2016, the English-language kindergarten has moved into new premises located on the main street of the city of Souris. This move had become necessary to redevelop and expand the premises of the former Rollo Bay Consolidated School which will become, from September 2017, the site of the new French school. La-Belle-Cloche School is currently located on the premises of the former Fortune Consolidated School, in the municipality of Fortune Bridge.

Sports
Mouse has impressive athletic strengths and fitness for its size. The village has fields for soccer, baseball, basketball, rugby, hockey, football, ringette and other similar sports. There are several parks in Souris.

(See https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Souris_(Prince-Edouard-Island))


Campbells Cove is a community in Kings County, Prince Edward Island, northeast of Souris.

(Cf. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Campbells_Cove)
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Km 0 Souris

Km 0 Souris
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Km 1.9 Port de Souris

Km 1.9 Port de Souris
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Km 2.1 Phare

Km 2.1 Phare
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Km 3.9 Route 16 et Mer

Km 3.9 Route 16 et Mer
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Km 5.6 Route 16 Est et Baie

Km 5.6 Route 16 Est et Baie
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Km 7.2 Route - Rivière - Mer

Km 7.2 Route - Rivière - Mer
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Km 8.7 Baie

Km 8.7 Baie
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Km 10.6 JCT Route 16 vs 302

Km 10.6 JCT Route 16 vs 302
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12.5 Kingsboro et Basin Head

12.5 Kingsboro et Basin Head
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Km 14.4 Basin Head

Km 14.4 Basin Head
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Km 14.5 Basin Head 2

Km 14.5 Basin Head 2
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14.7 Basin Head 3

14.7 Basin Head 3
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Km 18 vers East Point

Km 18 vers East Point
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Km 18.5 Route 16 Est

Km 18.5 Route 16 Est
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Km 20.5 Bothwell

Km 20.5 Bothwell
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Km 23.6 Southampton Lake Church

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Km 23.6 South Lake Church

Km 23.6 South Lake Church
Intersection

Km 28.6 JCT East Point Rd vs Lighthouse Rd

Km 28.6 JCT East Point Rd vs Lighthouse Rd
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Km 30.2 vers Lighthouse

Km 30.2 vers Lighthouse
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Km 30.5 Lighthouse

Km 30.5 Lighthouse
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Km 32.8 vers North Lake

Km 32.8 vers North Lake
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Km 35.7 Éoliennes

Km 35.7 Éoliennes
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Km 39 North Lake Harbour

Km 39 North Lake Harbour
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Km 39.8 Port de mer

Km 39.8 Port de mer
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Km 40.5 Lakeville

Km 40.5 Lakeville
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Km 52.3 JCT Route 16 West

Km 52.3 JCT Route 16 West
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Km 44.5 JCT Route 303

Km 44.5 JCT Route 303
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Km 47 Campbell Cove

Km 47 Campbell Cove

Comments

    You can or this trail