Time  5 hours 24 minutes

Coordinates 3886

Uploaded July 29, 2016

Recorded July 2016

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210 f
52 f
0
7.2
14
28.99 mi

Viewed 771 times, downloaded 0 times

near O'Leary, Illa del Príncep Eduard (Canada)

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Prince Edward Island or PEI (English: Prince Edward Island or PEI, Scottish Gaelic: Eilean a 'Phrionnsa, Mi'kmaq: Epekwitk (Francis-Smith)) is the smallest of Canada's provinces in terms of area and population. In 1864, Prince Edward Island hosted the Charlottetown Conference that led to Canadian Confederation in 1867. Nevertheless, it did not become a Canadian province until 1873. In the 2011 census, one it has a population of 140,204. At 24.7 people per square kilometer, it is the most densely populated province in Canada.

Climate
The climate of Prince Edward Island is humid continental that is, there is a big temperature difference between the cold months and the hot months. During the winter, the temperature can go down to -28 ° C.

Fauna and flora
The forest covers 50% of the area but the primary forest, consisting mainly of spruce, balsam fir and red maple, occupies only 290,000 hectares. Three centuries of colonization, along with forest diseases and fires, have almost wiped out the original forest of beech, yellow birch, maple, oak and American white pine1.
Prince Edward Island has a wide variety of wildlife including beaver, muskrat, mink, red fox, squirrel, snowshoe hare, striped skunks and coyotes. The territory is also rich in marine species.
Conservation of the environment has become an important issue. The removal of hedgerows, the use of chemical fertilizers, mechanization and agricultural overproduction in general are causing significant erosion of arable land leading to the silting up of ports and watercourses1. Some reforestation activities have been carried out1.
The North Atlantic right whale, one of the rarest whale species, was considered a rare visitor to the St. Lawrence until 1994. Since then, there has been a dramatic increase in numbers: off Perce in 1995, a progressive increase in all regions since 19984, around Cape Breton5 since 2014 and in Prince Edward Island, 35 to 40 whales were observed in 20156.


Natural Resources, Industry and Services
The island is poor in natural resources. No significant deposits of ore have yet been discovered but there are traces of coal, uranium and vanadium1. Natural gas is present in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, northeast of the Island, but is not large enough to be exploited1. Only sand and gravel are mined, but poor low quality production does not even meet provincial needs1. The forest is little exploited1.
Half of the island is very fertile land while arable land covers 90% of the area1. Until the 1950s, most farmers used horses, but the end of this practice freed up vast land previously used for fodder cultivation. From 1951 to 1996, the number of farms increased from 10,137 to 2,217 while the area under cultivation decreased by 39%. The average farm size has increased from 44 hectares to 119 hectares, while farmers' profit margins have dropped from 50% to 25% due to the increased cost of the equipment1. Governments are trying to curb the rural exodus while farms are becoming more expensive to start. Although agricultural production is declining, clearing continues. Agricultural production was valued at $ 317 million in 2000, of which $ 154 million was from potatoes1. The island has indeed a climate and a soil well adapted to this culture, and in particular for the production of seed potatoes. Three-quarters of the harvest is exported to 15 countries and the remainder is sold as is in North America or processed into frozen products such as french fries1. Tobacco, planted since 1959, is the second most important crop, despite the high cost and complexity of its production1. The province has 330 dairy farms and a herd of 16,000 cows producing 90 million liters of milk annually, 90% of which is processed into by-products, such as evaporated milk, generally for export1. 30,000 cattle are also sent to the slaughterhouse annually, although the price of meat fluctuates and production is down1. Pig farming is almost as important.
Fishing is the second primary industry on the Island. There were 6,500 fishermen and fish harvesters in 1994, working on 1,500 boats and creating 2,000 direct jobs in factories that processed fish valued at $ 139 million in 2000.1 The fishery is mostly coastal and the lobster is the most lucrative species1. Other molluscs are also caught, including scallops, oysters, clams and mussels. Oysters, whose production is concentrated in Malpeque Bay, are reputed1. Harvesting Irish moss, from which carrageenan is extracted, is an important industry west of the island1.
The manufacturing industry is mainly focused on the processing of fishery and agricultural products. This sector of the economy provided 4,800 jobs in 1997 while the value of production was valued at $ 1.1 billion in 20001. Major manufacturers include Cavendish Farms, DME International and McCain Foods. The government is trying to attract other types of industries, without any real success1. Some companies are still worthy of note include JD Irving, who operates a shipyard in Georgetown.
More and more people are working in services; governments employed 6,000 people in 19991.

Energy
Islanders are the most expensive to pay for electricity in Canada1. Summerside has a municipal distribution network while Maritime Energy distributes electricity to the rest of the island. Most of the electricity is imported from NB Power (New Brunswick) or Emera Energy Systems (Nova Scotia) via submarine cable. However, Maritime Energy has two thermal generating stations, one in Charlottetown and one in Borden-Carleton, operating at peak hours or in the event of a power outage and having an installed capacity of 104 megawatts (MW). Up to 54 MW can also be purchased from wind farms at Cape North or Eastern Kings Wind Farm.
Fuel oil is also very expensive, which encourages more and more people to heat their homes with wood. Although forests are not as exploited as in the nineteenth century, this industry creates more than 400 jobs.

Transport
Charlottetown Airport.
Main article: Transportation to Prince Edward Island.
The Confederation Bridge connects the island to the mainland. 12.9 km long, it is the longest bridge in the world to cross a stretch of frozen water in winter1. One ferry connects the island to Nova Scotia and another to the Îles de la Madeleine (Quebec).
An intercity bus service connects major cities, while Charlottetown has a public transit system, the Charlottetown Public Transit, consisting of 7 bus lines.
Charlottetown Airport offers scheduled flights to Halifax, Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Detroit and Boston. A second, smaller airport is in Summerside.
The railway was dismantled in 1989, after 114 years of existence. It has been converted into a bicycle path, the Confederation Trail, which consists of a portion of the Trans Canada Trail.

(See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince-Edouard Island)

O'Leary is a Canadian village in Prince Edward Island, Prince Edward Island, southwest of Tignish.

History
O'Leary was founded at the end of the eighteenth century, in the wake of the creation of the Prince County railroad, which became a service center, bringing traders and businesses to settle there.

Demography
O'Leary was incorporated as a village in 1951. For Statistics Canada, it is included in lot 6.

Population
• 812 (2011 census) 1
• 861 (2006 census) 2
• 860 (2001 census) 2

Economy
The community's economy is connected to the potato crop and is home to the PEI Potato Museum.

(See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O%27Leary_(Prince-Edward Island))

Tignish is a fishing village in Prince County on Prince Edward Island, Canada1.
It is located approximately 80 kilometers northwest of Summerside and 140 kilometers northwest of Charlottetown2. With a population of approximately 1,000 and over 700 in the surrounding areas, Tignish is considered by the government as a "village", which is a higher level than a locality, a level lower than a " town "and two levels lower than a city.
Tignish was founded in the late 1790s by nine Francophone and Acadian founding families, with other immigrants (mostly Irish) arriving in the nineteenth century and settling primarily in the small community of Anglo-Tignish. Today, many residents of Tignish are either Acadian or Irish.
One of the most popular and distinct structures in the community is the Catholic Church, St Simon & St Jude Catholic Church, which was one of the first major structures built in Tignish, and was built between 1857 and 1860.
It was in this village that the 7th National Acadian Convention was held in 1913.
The first Acadian newspaper on the island, L'Impartial, was created and published in Tignish from 1893 to 1915.

Community
Fishing is one of the important aspects of daily life and employment in Tignish, with many local families dependent on it for income. There are currently three harbors located in the Tignish area; Tignish Harbor, Skinners Pond Harbor and Seacow Pond Harbor.
Among Tignish's businesses are the Tignish Heritage Inn, which was a convent from 1867 to 1991, Eugene's General Store, Judy's take-out food, Shirley's Restaurant, Tignish's Cooperative Grocery Store, Hardware and Gas Station, Cultural Center, Cousin Dining, Pizza Shack, Perry Building and many more.
The citizens of Tignish celebrated the Tignish Bicentennial in 1999. Local celebrations included Acadian music, local festivals, carnivals and the creation of a local music CD enriched with the voices of Tignish residents. . In addition, every summer there is a bluegrass festival in Tignish.

Population
• 779 (2011 census) 3
• 758 (2006 census) 4
• 831 (2001 census) 4

Accent and dialect
Tignish has a very distinct accent and original dialect in eastern Canada. The sound is often etymologically described as a mixture of English, French and Scottish English / scots and there are several English common words that have an alternative and unique definition to Tignish, such as "slack" (meaning "careless"). "in English), which locally can say" good "or" impressive ". While the English from surrounding villages such as Alberton and O'Leary have a similar accent and dialect to other communities in the Maritime Provinces, the Tignish dialect is often described as independent and is often intelligible in other communities.

Education
Kindergarten students in the 12th grade in the Tignish area attend Tignish Elementary School for Grade 6 grades, followed by Merritt E. Callaghan Intermediate and Westisle High School. Composite for the 7th to the 12th.
Policy change the code]
Tignish is in District # 27 electoral boundaries of PEI, which is dubbed the Tignish-Palmer Road riding. The name of the constituency was already "Tignish-DeBlois", but was changed to "Tignish-Palmer Road" for the 2007 Prince Edward Island general election with small changes in boundaries.

(Cf. https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tignish)
Information

Km 0 O'Leary Musé canadien de la patate

Km 0 O'Leary Musé canadien de la patate
Information

Km 1.3 Piste direction Tignish

Km 1.3 Piste direction Tignish
panorama

Km 2 Piste

Km 2 Piste
panorama

Km 8.6 Piste et service sanitaire

Km 8.6 Piste et service sanitaire
panorama

Km 10.4 Piste suite

Km 10.4 Piste suite
Information

Km 10.8 Bloomfield

Km 10.8 Bloomfield
panorama

Km 13.4 Piste en forêts

Km 13.4 Piste en forêts
Information

Km 19.6 Elmsdale

Km 19.6 Elmsdale
Picnic

Km 19.7 Picnic Halte

Km 19.7 Picnic Halte
Intersection

Km 25 JCT Tignish vs Alberton

Km 25 JCT Tignish vs Alberton
panorama

Km 29.5 Piste

Km 29.5 Piste
panorama

Km 35.3 St. Louis

Km 35.3 St. Louis
panorama

Km 36.6 Piste en forêt

Km 36.6 Piste en forêt
panorama

Km 44.4 À 2 km de Tignish

Km 44.4 À 2 km de Tignish
panorama

Km 46.6 Tignish

Km 46.6 Tignish

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