Time  one hour 25 minutes

Coordinates 400

Uploaded August 26, 2014

Recorded August 2014

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937 f
676 f
0
3.4
6.7
13.46 mi

Viewed 2152 times, downloaded 3 times

near Saint-Lazare-de-Bellechasse, Quebec (Canada)

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The most pleasant track to go.

The Bellechasse Cycloroute occupies the route of two former railways operated by Quebec Central and Canadian National. For the sake of memory and for the benefit of its users, the RCM Bellechasse wanted to emphasize the historic anchoring of the Cycloroute, focusing on the extraordinary odyssey of the construction and operation of these two railways, which during several decades have created jobs and promoted the agricultural, forestry and social development of a dozen villages and rural parishes. You will find, along the route of about 74 km between Saint-Henri and Armagh, some 35 panels echoing the fantastic story of the two railways that have left the South of Bellechasse from its isolation: its construction, its stations , its villages, its infrastructure, its operation, until its transformation into a bike path in 2008.

The closure of part of the Monk rail line and the abandonment of the Sainte-Claire / Pelletier Station operation in 1987 prompted the Department of Transport to acquire the decommissioned rights-of-way to maintain their integrity. In 2008, the RCM of Bellechasse and eight municipalities began work on this Cycloroute, after signing a 60-year lease with the Government of Quebec.

Sainte-Claire is known for the manufacture of Prévost coaches. Visit the historic houses of Dr. Chabot and Eugène Prévost.

Saint-Malachie is in the center of the Cycloroute. This community displays the cultural influences of its founders in its rich built heritage.

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  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse jonction Route Saint-Thomas
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Sainte-Claire)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Sainte-Claire)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Sainte-Claire)
Stop and parking P3 This 74-kilometer bike path extends from the northern limits of the municipality of Saint-Henri to the Armagh Falls Park. It crosses 8 municipalities of the MRC and the 3 main roads of the territory (routes 277, 279 and 281). Parking, rest area and catering A parking and a rest area are available to cyclists in the street of the Station, in Sainte-Claire. In Taschereau Park, near the Etchemin River, there are park benches, tables and sanitary facilities for cyclists.
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Rivière Etchemin)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Rivière Etchemin)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Rivière Etchemin)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Rivière Etchemin)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Rivière Etchemin)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Rivière Etchemin)
Saint-Malachie is marked by Irish and Scottish colonization After the War of 1812, between the Americans and the English, several English soldiers receive land in the eastern part of the Township of Frampton (named East Frampton) along the Etchemin River. They surrender their lands to Gilbert Henderson (1785-1876) who became an important landowner of these places. The first pioneers come for the most part from Armagh, the religious capital of Northern Ireland, hence the name of Saint Malachie (1 094-1148), archbishop of that city. Originally erected in 1857 and civilly in 1874, this parish later gave the name to the municipality of Saint-Malachie-de-Frampton (Township of Frampton), and in 1948, the denomination is Saint-Malachie. The Etchemin River has its source in the Appalachian Mountains (Monts Notre-Dame). Its head is located in the municipality of Saint-Philémon (RCM Bellechasse) and flows southwest until its course reaches the outlet of Lake Etchemin. From this point, it turns away somewhat to flow along a south-east / north-west axis, going to flow into the St. Lawrence River at the height of Lévis. The Etchemin River is approximately 123 kilometers long with an average slope of 4.1 meters per kilometer. St. Malachi
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Saint-Malachie, Parc *Chemino*)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Saint-Malachie, Parc *Chemino*)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Saint-Malachie, Parc *Chemino*)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Saint-Malachie, Parc *Chemino*)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Saint-Malachie, Parc *Chemino*)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Saint-Malachie, Parc *Chemino*)
Stop and parking P4 Park "Chemino" (Green space entrance north to Main Street) The Malachois territory appears as a privileged area for hunting and brook trout fishing, particularly in the Etchemin River. A toad invasion that occurred in 1873 was at the origin of the name "La Crapaudière" which once made known these places. From the top of the coast of La Crapaudière, the view of the Etchemin valley and the surrounding villages is magnificent. Mount Kinsella is another place where panoramic views are exceptional.
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Hameau d'Abénakis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Hameau d'Abénakis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Hameau d'Abénakis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Hameau d'Abénakis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Hameau d'Abénakis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (Hameau d'Abénakis)
Abenaki Abenakis is a hamlet in the Canadian municipality of Sainte-Claire, part of the Regional County Municipality of Bellechasse in Chaudière-Appalaches, Quebec. The hamlet of Abenakis is located in the southeastern portion of the municipality of Sainte-Claire in the Regional County Municipality of Bellechasse in the Chaudière-Appalaches administrative region in the province of Quebec1. It is located at the confluence of the Abénaquis and Etchemin rivers. The Abenaki are a Native American people of New England belonging to the Algonquian peoples. There are two major tribes of Abenakis: the Abenaki of the West and the Abenaki of the East. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, they are present in the states of Vermont, New Hampshire and Quebec, having emigrated from the English colonies to avoid extermination like the Hurons. They obtained land to settle within the borders of Quebec.
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (tracel Rivière Abénaquis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (tracel Rivière Abénaquis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (tracel Rivière Abénaquis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (tracel Rivière Abénaquis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (tracel Rivière Abénaquis)
  • Photo of Cycloroute de Bellechasse (tracel Rivière Abénaquis)
Abenaki River Deck with steel structure, wooden deck, solid concrete abutments and piles with drum and header, measuring 85.55 m long by 4.0 m wide. Bridge 11709 of the Ministère des Transports du Québec. This structure is one of the three largest built in Bellechasse during the development of the Monk section. It was referred to as the "Tracel of the Abenakis". The crossing of the valley of the river Abenakis posed a certain challenge because of its great width. In addition to the impressive embankments at the ends, the construction of a bridge was needed to avoid ramps a little strong and short radius turns, in accordance with the requirements of the time. From Abenakis to Armagh, an inclination of about one meter per 220 m is measured, or about 0.2 degree. Built around 1908-1910, this bridge had to be "modern", solid and durable, so steel and concrete and not wood! The crossing of the valley by such a large viaduct was neither a feat nor a precedent, as evidenced by the viaduct of Cap-Rouge, or even the Quebec Bridge, built at the same time. The English-speaking builders called this type of structure "trestle". But the people here heard trethel, or tracel, hence the name that remained. This "Girder" model steel bridge with upper deck has three spans composed of two 19.14 m side beams, placed at each end, and two 31.32 m central lateral beams. They rest on solid concrete abutments at the ends and rest on two high piles also in concrete, with barrel and trestle (support apparatus of the steel beams at the top of the piles). It is 85.55 m overall, with a wooden deck measuring 69.6 m by 4.0 m wide. A giant crane on rails was used to install the huge steel beams. Owned by the Ministry of Transportation, it is inspected thoroughly each year. In 1984, the Canadian National described it as: "bridge with side beams, upper deck. Length: 228 feet. Location: Mile 183.70. Condition: fair - poor. Year of construction: 1912. »

5 comments

  • Photo of Ricky3777

    Ricky3777 Jun 30, 2015

    Parcours abordable pour débutant(e).

  • Photo of Har Kadosh

    Har Kadosh Oct 10, 2015

    Ça vaut la peine de s'arrêter ici et contempler la Rivière des Abénaquis à nos pieds. https://es.wikiloc.com/rutas-cicloturismo/cycloroute-de-bellechasse-sainte-claire-tracel-riviere-des-abenaquis-7643297/photo-4644075

  • Photo of Har Kadosh

    Har Kadosh Oct 10, 2015

    Il faut remercier les personnes ou organismes chargés de l'entretenir cette belle piste cyclable. https://es.wikiloc.com/rutas-cicloturismo/cycloroute-de-bellechasse-sainte-claire-tracel-riviere-des-abenaquis-7643297/photo-4644078

  • Photo of Har Kadosh

    Har Kadosh Oct 10, 2015

    Les affiches sur la piste sont une bonne idée. Ça nous invite à nous arrêter et à frôler de nos pies ces coins du pays. https://es.wikiloc.com/rutas-cicloturismo/cycloroute-de-bellechasse-sainte-claire-tracel-riviere-des-abenaquis-7643297/photo-4644079

  • Photo of Marc Andre Beauchemin

    Marc Andre Beauchemin Jul 13, 2018

    I have followed this trail  View more

    C'est une des pistes cyclables les plus belle de la région de Québec, en pleine campagne et dans les bois.

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