Time  6 hours 8 minutes

Coordinates 4954

Uploaded July 27, 2015

Recorded July 2015

-
-
232 f
83 f
0
9.6
19
38.56 mi

Viewed 2048 times, downloaded 9 times

near Burlington, Vermont (United States)

|
Show original
Burlington (Vermont)
Burlington is the largest city in the state of Vermont, United States. The city is also the county seat of Chittenden. Burlington is located on the east shore of Lake Champlain, 72 km south of the Canadian border (Vermont-Quebec) and 151 km south of Montreal. According to the latest US Census Bureau estimates, Burlington had a population of 42,417 in 2010.
This city is one of the first cities, if not the first, to operate with a 100% green power supply since 20151. The project was in progress since the 1990s: the inhabitants have agreed to pay a local tax ( Energy Efficiency Charge) to support its realization.
Burlington is part of an urban area comprising the contiguous towns of South Burlington, Winooski, Colchester, Essex and Williston and the village of Essex Junction. In 2010, this urban area had 208,055 inhabitants. The American outdoor magazine Outside names Burlington as "top American dream city".
Burlington is a university town, home to the University of Vermont and Champlain College. St. Michael's College is located nearby (in Colchester).

Climate
Lake Champlain and the Adirondacks seen from Burlington docks.
Burlington has a humid continental climate (Koppen DFB), with cold winters and hot, humid summers. Extreme cold ranges from -34 ° C (record of 15 January 1957) to a wet heat of + 38 ° C (record of 11 August 1944) 2 Spring and autumn are the transition seasons. From January to July, the average monthly temperature is -7.8 to + 21.4 ° Celsius. The annual rainfall is 917 mm and is well distributed throughout the year, but the summer months are the wettest. The geographic location of the city on the east shore of Lake Champlain is often a risky occurrence of snow squalls up to 33 cm in 12 hours several times. The annual snowfall is usually 206 cm, but this number can vary each winter.


History


The Statue of Ira Allen.
Burlington's earliest beginnings date back to the 1770s, when the Allen brothers built a wooden fort at the WinooskiNote 1 waterfall. Some settlers cleared the surrounding lands and agriculture began. In 1787, Ethan Allen built his house near the mouth of the WinooskiNote 2 River. The University of Vermont at Burlington established in 1791 and the Vermont College of Agriculture was based on land donated by Ira Allen.
In 1800, Burlington became one of the country's major ports, primarily for the import of Canadian lumber. Its population is then about 816 people3.
The War of 1812 between the Americans and the British is not very popular in Vermont. With the rest of New England, Vermont provides neither soldiers nor financial support.


Drawing of Burlington in 1858.
One time, during the war, 5,000 men were stationed in Burlington (more than the number of inhabitants of the time) but 500 of them die of diseases. Several of his soldiers are housed in the main building of the University of Vermont, which serves as a military hospital. On August 2, 1813, Burlington was bombed by British troops in a skirmish that the Americans had planned but ignored. This bombing lasted only about ten minutes and had no influence on the outcome of the war.


The Van Ness House, built in 1870, is the largest hotel in Burlington.
In 1823, the navigable canal of Lake Champlain was opened. It offers a continuous waterway from New York to Montreal via the Hudson River, Lake Champlain and the Richelieu River in Canada. With the opening of this canal, Burlington and Plattsburgh (located on the opposite shore of Lake Champlain in New York State), become important ports for timber and agricultural products to the South and for manufactured goods. New York to northern Vermont and Canada. Around 1830-1850, Burlington grew rapidly, becoming the preeminent city of the state of Vermont. Its population of 3,526 in 18305 rose to 7,585 in 18506.


Church Street in 1907.
With the arrival of the Rutland Railway in Burlington in 1849, the Burlington lumber industry continued to grow, and in 1862, when the Central Vermont Railroad reached Winooski, the dairy industry (established in the more rural part at South Burlington) begins selling milk to New England and Quebec. In 1865, the northwestern part of the current town officially became the municipality of Burlington. In 1885, the Winooski & Burlington Horse Railroad Company began trolley service throughout the city. The population is 14,590 people in 18907 to cross the 18,640 mark at the beginning of 19008
In 1929, the end of the Burlington tram service was marked by the burning of a streetcar in the city center. Burlington deindustrializes in the decade of the 1980s. Several old factories close. In the 1990s, to create a renewal: many abandoned industrial buildings are renovated in offices and housing. Once an industrial port, a marina for small pleasure boats appears on the shores. This gives birth to the Waterfront Park, a friendly place where you can leisurely stroll, sit, and relax.

Architectural Heritage
The current downtown is located on a hill overlooking Lake Champlain and home to the University of Vermont. The former industrial prosperity has left behind much of the Victorian era architecture, including the buildings of architects Ammi B. Young, HH Richardson and McKim, Mead & White. Burlington has become a filming location for the United States for some time (Myself & Irene (2000) and What Lies Beneath (2000)). Many industrial buildings of the early twentieth century have been restored. Preservation Burlington was founded in 19989 to protect historic architecture in Burlington. Each year, prizes are awarded for restoring old buildings.

Economy
Formerly a small industrial and port city, Burlington is today based primarily on the computer industry and on education and health services. The only major industrial facility is IBM's Semiconductor Plant (Essex Junction). IBM is the largest employer with 6,500 employees. The other major employers in Burlington are Fletcher Allen Health Care10 and the University of Vermont (employing 4086 and 3137 people respectively). There is also General Electric, which develops software for the healthcare industry at the former headquarters of IDX Systems.

Culture


The BCA is housed in a former fire station completely restored in 1994-1995.
Burlington is also a cultural city. This reputation comes for its strength in the arts and culture, Burlington offers opportunities typical of a much larger city where an eclectic mix of artists, designers, workshops and boutiques coexist. found mostly in Downtown Burlington. Church street is a pedestrian street located in the heart of the city, this is where many festivals are held throughout the year. This is where KT Tunstall was made known.


The Carnegie Fletcher Library.
Several art galleries are located around Church Street. Burlington City Arts, commonly referred to as the BCA, features contemporary art exhibitions and performances by visual artists11.
The Vermont Symphony Orchestra12 and the Lyric Theater Company13 are housed at the Flynn14 Concert Hall. There is also the Flynnspace which presents avant-garde performances.
Burlington has Vermont's largest public library, the Carnegie Fletcher Library. This library maintains the National Register of Historic Places.

Media
Burlington is the media center of northern and central Vermont. The most important publications are The Burlington Free Press, which is sold throughout Vermont, Seven Days15, a free weekly newspaper for the entire Burlington metropolitan area that deals with arts and culture in general, and Vermont Business Magazine16 a monthly newspaper on trade and industry in Vermont.


Vermont Public Television uses the Green Mountains relief as a logo
11 radio stations are based in Burlington serving the area. 7 television stations are broadcasting from Burlington: 3 small local community television channels (VCAM-Channel 1517, RETN-Channel 1618 and CCTV-Channel 1719) and 4 larger regional channels: WFFF-TV which is affiliated to the FOX network, WVNY which is affiliated with the American network ABC, WCAX-TV which is affiliated with the American network CBS, and Vermont Public Television a non-commercial educational channel affiliated with the PBS network. The other major US television network (WPTZ affiliated with NBC) and WCFE-TV (PBS network) are broadcasting from Plattsburgh, New York.

Municipal Administration


Burlington City Hall.
Burlington has integrated several former neighboring cities for about fifty years. Today, the administration of the city is organized around a municipal council: The Democrats have the majority of the votes on the municipal council. The city council has fourteen seats, which are currently occupied by seven Democrats, one Republican, five Progressives, and one Independent20 all elected by universal suffrage by the population. It is a democrat, Miro Weinberger, who has been the mayor since 2012.
A prominent local politician, Peter Clavelle was Mayor of Burlington from 1989 to 1993, and from 1995 to 2006.21 In 2004, he attempted to be elected as Democratic candidate for Vermont governorship against incumbent Governor Jim Douglas. and four other candidates but he is defeated 38% to 59% in favor of Jim Douglas.

Opening to the French language
Burlington City Council unanimously passed a resolution on August 8, 2011 to promote the use of French in municipal public services, restaurant menus and second language instruction in schools22. The new law does not make French mandatory as a second language, but it strongly suggests its use23 so Burlington will include French on road signs and at the airport. Burlington wants to seduce the many Quebecers who visit it during the summer season24. The municipality also invites merchants and tourism organizations to hire employees with basic knowledge of the French language25. The municipality is also preaching by example, hiring some Quebecers holding the American green card. Several shops and restaurants in Burlington have the small coat of arms Here we speak French.

Hobbies


Lake Champlain seen from Waterfront Park.
On the shores of Lake Champlain, many residents walk, walk their dogs or ride a bicycle. The place is called the Waterfront Park26. Every year there is the Lake Champlain Maritime Festival.
Near the lake and the renovated old harbor, the Burlington Aquarium and Science Center27 feature more than 70 species of fish, amphibians, invertebrates and reptiles.
Burlington hosts several festivals and events throughout the year:
• First Night, which is held every December 31st to mark the beginning of the new year;
• the winter carnival in February;
• the Mardi Gras parade: many bands play in bars and on the streets;
• The Burlington Discover Jazz Festival in June with free outdoor performances by Jazz and Blues artists28;
• fireworks during the American Independence Day party;
• a craft beer festival organized in July by the Vermont Breweries Association29,30;
• a circus arts festival, in early August organized street artists with the collaboration of the BCA31;
• The "Dragon boat racing", for the benefit of charitable organizations, has been held on Lake Champlain since August 2006.32 In 2009, there were approximately 2000 participants out of 86 teams33;
• a world cuisine festival, held in September;
• the Vermont Air Show: exhibition of old airplanes with aerial demonstrations;
• The Vermont International Film Festival34 presents several films on human rights in October.
Burlington is also a bike city with several dozen kilometers of bike lanes in downtown and in the suburbs. The Burlinton Bike Network is now connected to the Colchester Bike Trail along the shores of Lake Champlain. In the winter, some of these bike lanes become a cross-country ski trail.

Sports and sporting events [edit | change the code]


Centennial Field, the baseball stadium in the city of Burlington where the Lake Monsters of Vermont operate.
Sport in Burlington is an essential dimension of its integration into the United States. Thus Burlington has several sports teams that are members of American leagues. The Vermont Catamounts Multi-Sports University Club is part of the NCAA, the Vermont Baseball Lake Monsters team that is affiliated as the Oakland Athletic Club of the American League of Baseball and an American football team, the Vermont Ravens35 of the New England Football League36. There was also a Premier Basketball League franchise, Vermont Frost Heaves, which unfortunately closed in early 2011. This basketball franchise played its games at the Burlington Memorial Auditorium38 (which can accommodate 2,500 fans). There is also a rugby club (with a men's team and a women's team), the RFC Burlington39.


Gutterson Fieldhouse can accommodate 4,007 hockey fans.
Centennial Field Stadium is home to nearly 4,500 fans. It is used for baseball games, in addition there is adjacent a soccer field for University teams and for the Vermont Voltage of the PDL.
Every year, on the streets of Burlington, there is a running marathon, the KeyBank Vermont City Marathon, and the Green Mountain Racet Racetrack, which is the largest Pro / Am event on the East Coast.
The next Women's World Cup will be held at Gutterson Fieldhouse from April 7-14, 2012.

transport network


The Vermonter Amtrak service.
Burlington has an international airport and a train station with the Amtrak system for travelers. This Amtrak rail network connects Burlington (via Essex Junction Station) to New York and Washington on a daily basis41. In addition, Burlington is the focal point of the Chittenden County Transportation Authority (CCTA) 42, a public agency offering urban bus service and connections to other Vermont cities.


Winter ice on Lake Champlain.
Burlington is also home to the Lake Champlain Transportation Corporation 43, offering seasonal naval service between Burlington and Port Kent, New York. This Burlington-Port Kent route crosses the maximum width of the lake and lasts approximately one hour. Each year approximately one million passengers use ferries from Lake Champlain44. During winter, Lake Champlain is often ice-covered, making ferry service impractical.
Burlington is also served by Interstate 89 which connects it to other major cities in neighboring states.

Worship


The synagogue Ohavi Zedek.
The Episcopal See of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Vermont is in Burlington. St. Paul's Cathedral in Burlington, once a beautiful neo-Gothic church collapsed in 1817. Burlington also hosts several Protestant Christian communities. The First Baptist Church (on St. Paul Street) built in 1864 and the First Methodist Church of Burlington (on Winooski Avenue) built in 1869 are two historic buildings.
There is also a community of conservative Judaism46 grouped around the Ohavi Zedek synagogue. This building, built in 1885, is one of the oldest synagogues in the United States.
(See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burlington_(Vermont))


Alburgh (formerly Alburg) is a town in Grand Isle County, Vermont, United States, founded in 1781 by Ira Allen. The population was 1,998 at the 2010 United States Census. Alburgh is on the Alburgh Tongue, a peninsula extending from Canada into Lake Champlain, and lies on the only road-based route across Lake Champlain to New York State of Addison, Vermont.

Name spelling change
The original name of the town, Alburgh, was changed to Alburg in 1891 by recommendation of the United States Board on Geographic Names. The board recommended that all municipality names ending in -burgh be revised to end in -burg for the sake of standardization.[3] In April 2006, the Vermont Department of Libraries (in its capacity as the authority on Vermont place-names) approved Alburgh's request to change its name from Alburg to Alburgh after a majority vote on town meeting day.

European settlement of Alburgh Tongue and founding of Alburgh
A two-league strip between Missiquoi Bay and Chambly River (now Richelieu River) north of the Alburgh tongue was granted by Lieutenant Governor of Quebec Charles de la Boische, Marquis de Beauharnois, and Intendant of New France Gilles Hocquart to Seigneur François Foucault on April 3, 1733 (ratified by the King of France April 6, 1734). Other seigneuries (in particular the seigneurie de la Fontaine to the south) were granted but were not settled. Janvrin Dufresne surveyed the land for the government and submitted his report on June 14, 1737 that the seigneuries were not settled. Foucault thence resubmitted his application to the land in March 1739 (requesting an extension of one league to the south), having established Missiskouy (Missiquoi) Village with six inhabitants. On May 10, 1741, the seigneuries were deemed forfeited for lack of settlement; on May 1, 1743, Foucault's application was accepted (ratified by the King March 25, 1745). In 1744, Foucault petitioned to extend his seigneurie over the entire peninsula to a total length of five leagues and including the former seigneurie de la Fontaine; the petition was granted November 1, 1744. By 1747, however, the peninsula was abandoned by any European settlers.[citation needed]
In 1763 at the end of the French and Indian War, New France was ceded to Great Britain. General James Murray purchased the lands including Foucault's seigneurie, and his nephew Richard Murray granted a 99-year lease of the seigneurie to Colonel Henry Caldwell in 1774.[5]
Alburgh was charted February 23, 1781 by Ira Allen and 64 others. Allen paid for the charting and the name of the town is probably derived from "Allensburgh".
In 1781 Allen was part of the commission that negotiated the Vermont-New York boundary, placing the Alburgh Tongue in Vermont. In 1783 the Canada – United States border was established at the 45th parallel north, making the Vermonter claims to the land undisputed.

Geography
According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 48.8 square miles (126.4 km²), of which 29.3 square miles (75.9 km²) is land and 19.5 square miles (50.5 km²) (39.96%) is water. Alburgh is one of only six non-island locations in the 48 contiguous states not directly connected to them by land[citation needed], the others being nearby Province Point, Vermont; Point Roberts, Washington; Elm Point, Minnesota; the Northwest Angle in Minnesota; and an unnamed point in North Dakota. However, there are bridges to Rouses Point, New York (U.S. Route 2) and Swanton, Vermont, as well as to North Hero island to the southeast. This makes Alburgh not practically an exclave, unlike the other locations not connected to the United States by land. Isle La Motte lies to the southwest.

Demographics
As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,952 people, 791 households, and 529 families residing in the town. The population density was 66.6 people per square mile (25.7/km²). There were 1,259 housing units at an average density of 43.0 per square mile (16.6/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 96.67% White, 1.95% Native American, 0.15% Asian, and 1.23% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.20% of the population.
There were 791 households out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.4% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.1% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.97.
In the town the population was spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 100.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 99.0 males.
The median income for a household in the town was $33,148, and the median income for a family was $39,783. Males had a median income of $30,655 versus $23,750 for females. The per capita income for the town was $16,285. About 10.8% of families and 12.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.4% of those under age 18 and 13.9% of those age 65 or over.
(Cf. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alburgh_(town),_Vermont)
Intersection

Km 0 JCT Steele vs King

Km 0 JCT Steele vs King
panorama

Km 2.2 Lac Champlain

Km 2.2 Lac Champlain
Intersection

Km 5.8 Intersection

Km 5.8 Intersection
panorama

Km 6.4 Lac

Km 6.4 Lac
Bridge

Km 7.9 Rivière

Km 7.9 Rivière
Intersection

Km 8.7 JCT

Km 8.7 JCT
Camping

Km 9.6 Causeway Park

Km 9.6 Causeway Park
panorama

Km 10.6 Trail en terre

Km 10.6 Trail en terre
panorama

Km 11.8 Trail

Km 11.8 Trail
panorama

Km 12.4 Water

Km 12.4 Water
panorama

Km 13.6 Au milieu des eaux

Km 13.6 Au milieu des eaux
panorama

Km 16.2 Petit traversier

Km 16.2 Petit traversier
panorama

Km 16.3 End Road

Km 16.3 End Road
Information

Km 16.9 Informations

Km 16.9 Informations
panorama

Km 17.5 Trail

Km 17.5 Trail
panorama

Km 18.5 Trail en forêt

Km 18.5 Trail en forêt
Intersection

Km 18.8 JCT

Km 18.8 JCT
Intersection

Km 19.4 JCT Martin Rd vs South St

Km 19.4 JCT Martin Rd vs South St
panorama

Km 20.8 Pommes

Km 20.8 Pommes
panorama

Km 21.1 Allenholm Farm

Km 21.1 Allenholm Farm
Intersection

Km 23.5 JCT South St vs Road 2

Km 23.5 JCT South St vs Road 2
panorama

Km 26.6 Road 2 West

Km 26.6 Road 2 West
panorama

Km 28.6 Grand Isle

Km 28.6 Grand Isle
Intersection

Km 33.5 JCT US Route 2 vs Shore N

Km 33.5 JCT US Route 2 vs Shore N
panorama

Km 37.1 Maison sur Le Lac

Km 37.1 Maison sur Le Lac
panorama

Km 35.8 Marina

Km 35.8 Marina
panorama

Km 39.5

panorama

Km 39.5 Lac

Km 39.5 Lac
panorama

Km 43 Maison et champ

Km 43 Maison et champ
panorama

Km 43 Maison

Km 43 Maison
panorama

Km 44 North Hero

Km 44 North Hero
panorama

Km 44.4 Magasin général

Km 44.4 Magasin général
panorama

Km 44.9 Lac

Km 44.9 Lac
Bridge

Km 53.1 Bridge

Km 53.1 Bridge
Bridge

Km 53.3 Bridge

Km 53.3 Bridge
panorama

Km 54.7 Alburgh

Km 54.7 Alburgh
panorama

Km 61.8 Ranson Bay Inn

Km 61.8 Ranson Bay Inn

Comments

    You can or this trail